December 11, 2020

Will You Get a Covid Vaccine Shot?


 In record time, several pharmaceutical companies have developed vaccines that seem to be extremely effective against Covid-19. After multiple clinical trials and lab testing, they appear to be ready for prime time. The FDA has yet to approve any of the drugs for public distribution, but permission to proceed is very close, maybe even granted since this post was written.

The U.K. started giving Jabs, as they call it, earlier this week. Apparently, two people who had very bad allergies to several things had a reaction to the shot, so the drug company is cautioning those who carry an Epipen to avoid shots at this time.

The logistics of distributing this medicine will not be simple. The speed at which doses can be produced is unknown. One company says they may be able to produce 100 million doses by spring. While that sounds like a lot, remember that people all over the world are in need. 

Exacting standards for both preparation and storage will make a quick nationwide rollout impossible.  Who is offered the vaccines, and in what priority is a decision still under discussion. As you might imagine, there are major moral, economic, and political calculations involved. Are there enough people trained to inject others is a real question. Will the military have to help with distribution? 

Several public figures have stepped forward to help promote the safety of the shots. Bill Clinton, Barrack Obama, and Joe Biden have said they will be publically inoculated to show their support, both literally and figurately. At some point, we should expect Hollywood and sports celebrities to join them.

Obviously, the long term effect of a particular type of vaccine is unknown. Anyone who accepts one of the first batches of doses is taking a risk, however small. Because of pre-existing conditions, some may not be the best candidates this early in the process. There are also tens of millions of people who hold beliefs about most vaccines that would mean they are not likely to volunteer to be poked with a needle.

Anti-vaxxers will complicate the effectiveness of any medicine. If even a significant minority of any country's population chooses to not be protected, the spread of Covid will continue to be a global problem. Any anti-vaxxer who falls ill might need hospital space and medical care. And, of course, they could affect others in the family or around them.

Could businesses require proof of a vaccine to become employed? Will airline companies ask for proof before allowing people to board planes? What about schools and colleges? If so, how will those who refuse the shot be dealt with?

All of which brings me to the question I am asking you: will you get a Covid vaccine when it becomes available? For high-risk folks, that may be a question that becomes real over the next few months. For those who are at a lower risk of becoming seriously ill or die from the pandemic, the question may not become a reality for the better part of 2021.

Eventually, each of us will be faced with a critical decision: get a shot now or wait for any side effects to surface and the safety of the medicine to be validated by others.

So, there you have it: what will you do when the opportunity presents itself?


107 comments:

  1. Senator Al Franken has suggested paying Americans $200 upon receipt of the first jab, and another $200 on receipt of the second. A solid proposal that would cost the Treasury a tad less than $74 billion. We spent $3 billion more than that last year alone on military operations in Afghanistan.

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    1. Interesting. I had not seen that story. Our economy and the strain on health care services and people have certainly exceeded $74 billion, so I understand his logic. While that idea has little chance of happening, it is good to see people looking at alternative ways to convince folks to protect themselves and others.

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  2. I'll get the vaccination for COVID for the same reason I get the annual flu shot- it reduces the risk of illness and allows me to carry on with the enjoyment of life( e.g. travel).

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    1. I have never had a negative reaction to any shot (flu, shingles, pneumonia) so I should be a good candidate.

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  3. Yes but only one of the 2 with 95% effectiveness, not the British vaccine much less effective.

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    1. ?? The Brits are using the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine, which is supposed to be 95% effective.

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    2. That was my understanding, too. The negative reactions were from people with severe allergies.

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    3. Lynn means the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine being developed in the UK, the one approved there right now is the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine as Hope says. My understanding from what I've read in the pubic arena is that the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine has gone back to stage 3 trials as the results were not clear due to some trial irregularities, some results showed 60% effective and some showed 90% effective (overall 70%). This vaccine does, however, have some significant advantages if it is approved with the main one being that it can be stored in a regular refrigerator rather than at the super cold -100F needed for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. This will have huge implications for distribution, especially in remote locations and in countries with less developed infrastructure. We'll see if the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine becomes an approved option. As they say "All the results aren't in yet" and as far as I am aware the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine hasn't even been submitted for approval yet.

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  4. Yes, want and need to help this country get back to normal and protect myself. As a recently retired nurse of 42 years, my heart aches for those still working in my local hospital and see how overworked they are and scared with what they are seeing and what they anticipate in the next few weeks especially. If nothing done, one way or another this will kill many...ie, no beds and staff available to care for other problems ( MI, CVA etc) and prevent elective and preventive procedures. if people would just wear a f*** ing mask, distance, frequent hand washing and not gather in groups for a few months we could improve our lives......but so many are just idiots! Phew!

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    1. I have read several stories about massive pushback against masks and basic care in South Dakota. Not surprisingly, Covid is now a major problem in that state. I wonder if "personal freedom" carries with it any liability if someone's actions in this regard sickens someone else? From a legal standpoint should it be any different than liability in a car accident?

      Maybe if people start suing those who demand the freedom to sicken and kill others, the use of basic protection will change.

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  5. Until they announced that people who have severe allergies shouldn't get the covid-19 vaccine I would have gotten in line. But I've been hospitalized with severe reactions to various things including medications, so I won't get it.

    I suspect in time getting the vaccine will become a requirement of employment and being on college campuses. Some people just won't do anything that is good for the general population until they have a carrot or a stick pushing them to do it.

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    1. Over time, maybe the light will dawn on those rejecting it for no valid reason, and getting the shot will be no different than a flu shot or any other preventive step.

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  6. I’m a yes but my husband who is 71 and has a heart condition and s extremely sensitive to Chicago’s including some medicines is a maybe and wants to wait a while

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    1. That makes sense, though I would be very sensitive to Chicago in the winter time!

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  7. Yes, I will get the vaccine as soon as I am eligible. I worked in the pharmaceutical industry for 20 years and I understand how rigorous the process is for approval.

    Here in Canada the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine approval came through on December 9th and the first shots are set for Tuesday December 15th at major hospitals in "red" zones where infection rates are highest. The initial roll out plans here are for those that work in healthcare and long term care, long term care and retirement home residents, then everyone over 80. As the supply of vaccines is limited it will take a while to get through that initial group. After that it's less clear though it will likely be by descending age groups (perhaps 5 years at at time so those over 75, then 70 etc.) Some front line workers such as teachers, daycare workers, police and so on may move up the priority list but that hasn't been determined yet.

    I imagine for someone like me, age 67 and in good health, my turn will come up in the May-June 2021 timeframe but that's just a guess, nothing is certain at the moment.

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    1. There is also the necessity to receive two doses for the vaccine to be fully effective. America's initial shipment of 100 million will only work for 50 million people, so full coverage will take quite a while.

      My wife and I will need to be fully vaccinated before we will even consider vacations out of our home area.

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  8. Without question, as soon as its available. And for the record, it will most likely also be part of the 2021 flu vaccine.

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    1. Combing the two would certainly be a good idea.

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  9. I also meant to mention vaccine hesitancy... Right now we don't have enough vaccine for those that want it, never mind those that don't, and for about the next year or so vaccine hesitancy will be an academic problem. Let's see if it becomes an issue down the road but for now, in my opinion, it's not worth worrying about. I did hear an infectious disease specialist say that if the vaccine does turn out to be 95% effective as the trials indicated then we'd need something in the 70% range of vaccine uptake for decent herd immunity which seems eminently achievable. If the vaccine turns out to be only 50% effective then we'd need 100% vaccine uptake which will be difficult.

    Having the vaccine is unlikely to be made compulsory here but it may become mandatory for things like attending school, working in a hospital and so on. You can choose not to have the vaccine but then you will also be choosing not to be able to do any number of things. Freedom of choice but choices have consequences.

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    1. As I noted above, I would not be surprised if some enterprising lawyers aren't already figuring out how to use class action lawsuits against those who choose to not be vaccinated, even if there are no valid reasons to not do so.

      At your 70% rate, then means about 230 million Americans will need the shots. That is going to take quite a while.

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    2. Billions around the globe to be vaccinated means there is an almost unimaginably huge task ahead of us. As Winston Churchill said during WW II... "Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. but it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning"

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  10. Absolutely, as soon as I am eligible. I have had slight arm soreness from the flu shot and some sluggish, tired, fluish feeling for a day after the Shingrex shot, but well worth it if this vaccine can make life return to anything near normal.

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    1. Hope: I counsel my Shingrix patients that flu-like symptoms are a good thing because it means your body is mounting a robust immune response. A second injection, 2 to 6 months later, is required to lock in the antibody immunity as protection fades over time if you stop after the first dose.

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  11. I can hardly wait! I know it’s only a first step on the path to normalcy but I’d like to be on my way.

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    1. I will roll up my sleeve as soon as asked to.

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  12. This vaccine has come to market faster than any vaccine,ever. ANd of course, a pandemic certainly means we have to stretch “the rules”.. that said, us regular folks a re not going to see availability for some time yet. Our front line workers, and people who live in communal settings ill be first. Dr. Cara Christ has a great video out this morning in Arizona..reminding us who will be first in line.After those groups, educators and essential workers and vulnerable groups.. it’s gonna be a while. I don’t want to be one fo the first. I also am fairly certain I had Covid back in Mid January to February 7. All the symptoms and debilitating fatigue. I lose 13 pounds! ,.It was brutal.I wonder if we will have antibody tests available so as not to waste a dose on someone who already has had it??

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    1. I doubt that rules were stretched but the whole vaccine development process was prioritized at the top of everyone's list with many steps running concurrently rather than serially. With practically every developer working on it and with funding that was about as open ended as you can get a lot of the usual constraints were minimized.

      I heard someone compare it to a Hollywood movie. Making a Hollywood movie usually takes years to line up a script, find a backer to put up millions of dollars, get a director on board, have it casted, hire the film crew, shoot it, edit it, and add a sound track BUT if every person in Hollywood was devoted to making just this one movie it would happen in record time.

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  13. First, those ads on your site are really annoying. Could they moved to a side bar by any chance? As for the shot, tough call in a way. If it is as ineffective as the flu shot , then what's the point? My aunt died from flu and she had received the flu shot a month earlier. I guess my answer is maybe. But it won't be the first go round. I am an essential worker and 66 years old so will probably be offered it. Sherry

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    1. I have removed all ads from the desktop version of the blog. Unfortunately, i have no control of what Google does with the mobile app version. I would love to see them all removed. If you can, read the blog on a computer or tablet instead of a phone.

      Yes, you are likely to be near the head of the line.

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    2. Bob, I read your blog on my laptop and a huge ad always pops up right under your title. Right now it's an Office Max ad....Glenda

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    3. I am afraid there is nothing I can do to eliminate ads that Google (who owns Blogger) adds. My choice to to close the blog or move to a different platform, neither of which are attractive options at the moment.

      I apologize. If I could eliminate them I would.

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  14. I definitely get it as soon as I can, which I know will be awhile and the availability may be short in red states like Fla. With DeSantis the governor. Heard he had no plans for distribution.
    I’m assuming once you get the two, you are safe around the idiots who still won’t wear a mask, distance or probably take the shots. We will always have the antivaxers to deal with.
    And I never had any reaction to any shot

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    1. Florida officials seem bent on denying reality for as long as possible. After arresting the official who had data that disputed the "official" version, everyone is in for a rocky road in terms of distribution. For a state with such a large senior population that doesn't bode swell for the future.

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  15. I am going with science, I will take the vaccine as soon as possible. This summer will probably be the first available date for me. The vaccine will not become mandatory. We will have to live with the consequences of ignorant people. Those that I know refused the vaccine will be permanently banned from my association. I am tired of making nice with individuals that are willfully ignorant. Family will not be exempted. Those that cannot take it for medical reasons will be the most negatively affected by the abstainers. Most likely we will be wearing masks for much longer than anticipated. I intend to be much more vocal in the future when I run into obvious ignorance. If you think the world is flat or created only 6000 years ago mentioning it around me will be an invitation to a full verbal assault. Ignoring ignorance does not make it go away.

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    1. I can see schools, airlines, cruise ships, and employment in certain fields demanding proof of coverage. I agree that this country will never force someone to do the smart thing. But, that comes with consequences, including lots of lawsuits filed by people who believe their rights are more important than my health.

      I can already hear the screams when someone is refused air transportation or enrolling their kid in public school.

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    2. Good for you, Fred. I'm with you. And yes, my husband and I will both get it as soon as we are able. I'm a 66 y.o. woman in good health, still working full time alongside my husband. We work alone in a small business and we feel healthy and fortunate. Others need it more than me, but as soon as I'm able, I'm there.

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  16. Dear Bob and Friends, nope, never had a flu shot, and don't want a covid one either. am fortunate enough, that when sick, i can call off and stay home.

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  17. Dear Fred, Wow! Hope the rest of your day goes better.

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    1. Sue, If you do catch covid and can stay home without contacting anyone else that would be great. The problem with that is there is a period of time when folks have no symptoms and they are very contagious, some people never have symptoms. The second issue is if you require medical care. Now you are endangering health care workers and possibly preventing someone else with a different medical need from obtaining a hospital bed. We live in a society that depends on helping each other, it is not just about the individual.

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    2. Indeed. It’s time in this country we quit thinking about just ourselves, but others as well and quit being so obstinate and selfish.

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  18. Yes, I will absolutely be one of the first people in line for the vaccine in my area on the first day that I am eligible for the shot. I see the vaccine as being a key contributor to getting (almost) back to normal and being able to travel and socialize again without fear that you are risking your health or your life.

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    1. I will get the shot as soon as available, I’m interested in how soon with my situation. I’m 66 but was working as a RN in a state psychiatric hospital as an intermittent (post retirement from there) but have suspended working for now due to Covid and my state’s (Minnesota) terrible stats right now. I’m needed at work and would like to go back.

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  19. I will get vaccinated as soon as I can get at one. So will my husband. The one most likely to show up in our rural area is probably the Oxford or similar as we aren't rich and full of deep-cold storage facilities here. But any port in a storm. We're both at risk of severe COVID so even something as effective as a flu shot would be fine. My worst fear of this virus is bringing it home and killing my husband with it. It's starting to kill people I know.

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  20. i am amazed at how almost everyone commenting is ready to just line up for a supposed shot. For one thing, the testing phase hasn't even been a year. The other thing is: this all could be but a rehearsal for, down the road ... something wicked coming this way.

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    1. I am pretty sure it is not just a supposed shot, but reality. With the virus killing over 3,000 people a day in the U.S. I am not sure we have the luxury of an extended rollout.

      I am not quite sure what your final sentence implies, so rather than assume, I will just indicate confusion.

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  21. Yes I will take it shortly. I work in a hospital and we are physically and emotionally exhausted and need to get this virus under control. For those of you who won't take the vaccine, come spend an hour in my hospital on a COVID unit, seeing what these patients go through........you'll get religion real fast.

    Staying anonymous because I just don't have anymore energy to deal with the inevitable anti-vax blowback.

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    1. It is so sad and disappointing that so many people see hidden conspiracies or political points to be scored on the backs of such a devestating pandemic..for the front line people as well as those sickened or dead.

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    2. Thank you for hanging in there for the benefit of the rest of us during this pandemic. It might not seem like it sometimes but you are greatly appreciated.

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    3. Yes, Anon...thank you. Please take care of yourself, as best you can under the circumstances. I worked in healthcare in a previous life, and my late sister was an ICU nurse (she passed years ago). I know how difficult your jobs are under normal circumstances let alone now. I for one am grateful and will follow recommendations and take care of myself as best I can. No politics necessary.

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  22. My son is an immunologist and my son-in-law participated in the Pfizer trials. After discussing it with them, my husband and I will be getting the shot as soon as it's available to us.

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    1. Fabulous. I so appreciate the insight from someone who is closely involved with the facts and development of the vaccine. You and your husband have a high level of confidence! We all need to share that trust.

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  23. We will take it as soon as it is available. I want to travel again, and can't imagine doing that without being vaccinated.

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    1. Travel without the vaccine would be foolhardy and probably not permitted.

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  24. My wife and I will be taking it as soon as its available. My daughter will likely be one of the first to get it as she is a health care worker.

    I'm not sure if it's specific to the vaccine we will be getting in Canada, but the vaccine is required to be stored in extreme cold: something like -70 degrees. That is likely to be another factor in slowing down how quickly a whole population can be vaccinated.

    There is also talk of some activities here in Ontario requiring proof that you have been vaccinated. It'll be interesting to see how that pans out.

    Derek.

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    1. My understanding is those extreme temperatures are required whenever that vaccine is to be shipped. Then, there are only a handful of days to actually use the vaccine before its effectiveness drops.

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  25. Yes, I will be vaccinated. NC just rolled out their plan and unfortunately, I will be in the last phase, phase 4.

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    1. Well, being in Phase 4 should mean you are at low risk. I guess that is a reason to smile!

      Best of luck staying healthy from now until it is your turn.

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  26. Yes, I will get the vaccine as soon as I'm eligible (late winter or spring?). My reasons are partly selfish: I live alone with no spouse, no kids, and no family living nearby. The isolation of the past nine months has been challenging, even for an introvert. (The last time I saw another human being in person without a face mask on was early July, when infection rates were very low in Maine, and a friend and I took off our masks long enough to share strawberry shortcake and iced tea out on my porch.)

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    1. Yes, this has been a very tough year, but especially when people are cut off from others. As winter descends on Maine I hope you stay warm and busy. The vaccine should arrive just in time for the snow melt! Something to really look forward to.

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  27. I am 74, carry an epipen, and will get the vaccine as soon as my allergist deems I can.

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  28. Absolutely, for both me and my husband. For us it will probably be in May or June at the earliest. We're in Tucson until May, but we're Washington residents so will most likely be on that schedule. I trust the science.

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    1. Who thought we'd ever have to reiterate "I trust the science." Safe times for you and Art.

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  29. unknown risk vs known reward. My wife and I will get it as soon as we can.

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    1. That is a good way of explaining your decision.

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  30. Before I retired I worked at a hospital which had mandatory flu vaccines but I was allergic to the preservative. I got the flu 3 to 4 times each season. I read on the CDC site that there was a preservative free version and begged the hospital to provide it. It took 2 years but they started making that one available. I have not had the flu since. I am at high risk and my parents at 90 and 85 are even worse. We will get the vaccine as soon as it is available. I live in Florida, no telling when that will be

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    1. That is very intetesting: a preservative-free flu shot. I had no idea there was such a thing. I wonder how many other people have problems with innoculations caused by preservatives?

      So, that begs the question. Does the Pfizer vaccine have preservatives that could cause you and others problems?

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    2. Just saw today that DeSantis wants to give only one shot and not follow the Pfizer quidelines of two. Can you imagine such a thing! He’s such a horrible governor and a big big Trump supporter.

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    3. If that is true and not just posturing, Florida will continue to be in deep trouble. One shot won't cut it.

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    4. I heard on the news that it was preservative free but will of course double check before I get the shot.

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  31. Been checking the numbers of deaths from covid. In the US, there's about 330 million people; covid deaths are at around 3 million - about a third of one percent (1%). Most people who become very ill or die from covid, already have other serious health issues.

    Isn't it rather selfish, that because of less than 1 percent of the population (with one foot on a banana peel - to begin with) there's a far greater percentage of americans who are losing, if not have already lost their jobs/homes due to the way-over-the-top economic restrictions. Whaddabuncha bolshevik!

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    1. Wow, sheer ignorance and inhumanity expressed here.

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    2. Can you even grasp that more people have died from Covid than killed in WWI and more die every day than died during 9/ 11?
      Tell the families of the 300 thousand that have died of your attitude and lack of empathy. You should be ashamed.

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    3. I am leaving Sue's comment because it is her right to be so wrong. Of course, 3 million Americans have not died from Covid, it is 300,000. 16 million have been infected.

      This country went (rightfully) full ballistic when 3,000 people died during 9/11. That is the number dying every single day from Covid. That doesn't phase those who value human life so cavalierly. If you have a hard time grasping the seriousness, how would you react to a World Trade Center-Pentagon-Pennsylvania attack EVERY DAY for months?

      Guess who will show up at the hospital door begging for help when she is the one who slips on the Covid banana peel, and our heroes at that hospital will treat her, no questions asked.

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    4. Yeah, not to mention the often overlooked adverse health effects of a meaningful volume of Covid patients who survive. She's apparently another one of those, "Free-Dumb Fighters", who are also inconvenienced by wearing a mask in public settings. Poor baby. Reason and science have provided us longer lives and less poverty, world wide, since The Enlightenment, but there will always be Flat-Earthers in our midst.

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    5. The long term affects of non-fatal Covid are unknown yet. But, early evidence is indicating problems.

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    6. Wow Bob, the election is over. You WON! that should mean that the intolerant, rude name calling should come to an end. What Sue says is backed by The WHO, the CDC and most infectious disease agencies. Even St Fauci said that kids are safest in school.
      The only country to come out ahead of this entire thing is China. They did shut downs at the beginning, and then strategically when it popped up significantly. They are a dictatorship. Works for them. Their export numbers this quarter were !GREAT! because they rolled medical manufacturing to the rest of us.
      They have learned one great thing about the older- you know the "free love"- generation of the first world- no need for anything else, threaten their health and they can create fear that will shut down everything! Wooo HOOO.

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    7. You mean like her mysterious phrase, "Whaddabuncha bolshevik!"

      Putting economy before 16+ million already infected, and about 300,000 killed and counting and our children and elderly's health? I disagree. It is the people who think mask-wearing is some sort of freedom test and putting everyone at risk that gall me.

      I know the election is over; tell that to Mr. Trump and a boatload of GOP people who are still fighting to overthrow democracy.

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    8. The comment by Janette is misinformed. The agencies she names in no way endorse needless suffering and death, nor spreading of Covid-19 by children.

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    9. I don't know Goodly. Seems that Education is my field of study and I watch it pretty carefully. Children do not, by enlarge, spread or get serious cases of COVID. Sure some children do- a VERY few. You are sadly misinformed, but it fits the narrative that keeping old people safe is WAY more important then children.

      And Bob, you are saying that continuing to call people names is the way to help keep democracy alive and well? Now THAT is an interesting comment.

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    10. Janette, you are right. I guess after four years of listening to Trump insult and degrade just about everyone and everything he disagrees with, my primal brain just wants to have some payback. I should be bigger than that.

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    11. I think the problem is ageism. The majority of people dying are old. If we had lost 300,000 children to Covid, I think we would have a completely different mindset regarding the virus. Sad what that says about our society.

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  32. Yes as soon as it’s available in Florida to us regular old folks. Lol.

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  33. We (63&70) are in phase 4 for our area (controlled by John Hopkins). Healthy seniors with few side issues. We would like to get the anti body test first, but those are reserved for important people like the NBA. Pretty sure we had it almost exactly a year ago. But, we will get the injections when they become available.
    I have been watching the huge freezer units being placed on jumbo jets to fly all over. It has been almost as amazing as when they were putting on mobile hospitals. Go Military!

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    1. The logistics of distribution are quite something. This is what can be accomplished when dedicated people work together. I like to read that the major airlines are offering planes, along with Fedex and UPS to help the military get the vaccine where it is supposed to go.

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  34. Goals for vaccination if supply is limited
    ACIP set the following goals for recommending which groups should receive COVID-19 vaccines if supply is limited:
    * Decrease death and serious disease as much as possible
    * Preserve functioning of society
    * Reduce the extra burden the disease is having on people already facing disparities
    * Increase the chance for everyone to enjoy health and well-being
    Ethical principles
    ACIP identified four ethical principles to guide their decision-making process if supply is limited:
    * Maximize benefits and minimize harms — Respect and care for people using the best available data to promote public health and minimize death and severe illness.
    * Mitigate health inequities — Reduce health disparities in the burden of COVID-19 disease and death, and make sure everyone has the opportunity to be as healthy as possible.
    * Promote justice — Treat affected groups, populations, and communities fairly. Remove unfair, unjust, and avoidable barriers to COVID-19 vaccination.
    * Promote transparency — Make a decision that is clear, understandable, and open for review. Allow and seek public participation in the creation and review of the decision processes.


    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations-process.html

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    1. All noble goals and guidelines. We will all see if politics interferes with these recommendations. I sincerely hope not.

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  35. We're anxiously awaiting the vaccine. We're in tier 1C (over 65 etc group)..thinking we should be vaccinated by the end of March with any luck! Science rules & at this point, it's the only way we'd do this.

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    1. Frankly, I don't know what tier I am. Should I assume somehow I will be notified when it is my turn?

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  36. Science has been the bedrock of my life and career. I have been deep into the literature about this virus and the vaccines for months now. Yes, I will take the vaccine as soon as my turn comes, without hesitation.

    When we reach the other side of this pandemic I believe that some of the lessons and knowledge we have gained along the way will serve to assist us when the next one comes along. And it will come. But like our current circumstance, ignorance and personality cults will inevitably wield influence over the behavior of some and many will suffer as a result. In my own community, I am still astounded that there are people who refuse to wear masks in public, proclaiming it as "my right." To me, such action is giving a giant middle finger to the healthcare workers who have to deal with the results of such actions and are nearing a breaking point in many parts of the country. In some aspect, this has been the most disappointing response to the pandemic. Selfish. Purely selfish.

    Rick in Oregon

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    1. The illogical, dangerous, selfish, and ultimately harmful to self attitude is tremendously disappointing to me, also. It springs from both an attitude of entitlement and the message coming from the WH for the past four years: Me first, in all things.

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  37. I have a a whole slew of auto-immune issues, sensitivities to medicines and other medical problems. I'm hesitant to take a new vaccine that has yet to show all of it's possible side effects. Even so, I will probably take the shot when I'm called to do so.

    I'm am worried that if I wait it might be years before I have another opportunity. That's my dilemma.

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    1. Your situation is one that many of us share. While the vaccine has passed all the clinical trials, what happens, over time, in the real world, is not guaranteed. For those who don't react well to many medicines, frankly, I don't know the answer.

      If you are part of a group scheduled to receive the shot and you pass for now, do you go to the back of the line? How long do we all have to wait until there is enough data to feel safe?

      I will take the shot because I don't have the long list of problems like you. If I were in your shoes, I don't know. I trust the science that has developed the vaccine. But, what happens to someone with lots of medical problems? We won't know for quite some time.

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  38. I am 66 and in the group of people particularly susceptible to Covid. I will get the vaccine as soon as it is available to me (after essential workers, I believe, as it should be). I have never had more than the standard reactions to flu/shingles/pneumonia vaccines and I am willing to take the risk regarding side effects for this one. I want to do my part to build herd immunity and of course I don’t want to hide in my house for the rest of my life.

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    1. You and I are on the same page. I have had all the standard preventive shots like you and have had no reactions (a little sore after the pneumonia one). So, my faith is in the science of all this.

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  39. Speak to your doctor or pharmacist (they know so much) about what group you're in. South Carolina, where I live, is following CDC guidelines (sometimes we do things right) but it's up to the states.
    All weekend I got messages, emails, texts, from my much more liberal, than thou or I, friends with an article that talked about how our DNA will be changed and stored in the cloud. I replied to all: "I stopped reading when she mentioned the 'evil Melinda Gates,' and don't you know how to use this incredible invention called Google where this 'doctor' was widely debunked?"
    We can't know the long term affects, and that scares me. But being 70, and not living near my family and closest friends, I will take the chance.
    A lot of people here live as if there's no COVID though we have been hit hard. If they get the vaccine before I do I will be very angry. I need my life back. They still go to restaurants, on vacation, etc.
    Do we reward that behavior by putting them at the front of the line? Though I will be very angry, a part of me believes that they should get it first as not understanding the concept of asymptomatic, they don't get tested. In order to reach herd immunity we need as many people as possible to be vaccinated.

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    1. In a warped kind of way, the biggest deniers should get the shots first, though they are not likely to accept it. After all, they are the people most likely to spread the virus through their behavior.

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  40. Yes, OF COURSE I will get the vaccine as soon as I am eligible. Aside from the benefits to myself of being protected from this infectious and deadly disease, it is my duty to do what I can to prevent transmitting the disease to others around me. The sooner most of us are vaccinated, the sooner our small businesses and economy can recover. Our physicians, healthcare workers, and long term care home staff have been living through a nightmare trying to help patients with COVID. We need to give them a break.

    Jude

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  41. Yes, as soon as ita available to me. Really missing people and my distant family and want to see them as soon as we can

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    1. That is a major motivator for so many. I hope you are near the top of the list.

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