August 16, 2018

What Does a Satisfying Retirement Mean To You?


One thing has become abundantly clear in the eight years this blog has been published: there is no one answer to what a satisfying retirement looks like. What may have been a satisfactory answer just a few years ago, may no longer apply. The retirement landscape is continually shifting under our feet.

Even the idea of traditional retirement age is in flux. You have probably read the same headlines that I have: the "new" retirement age is 70, or 80, or not at all. At the same time, the Internet is filled with examples of folks who aim to retire at 40, or even 30. Retiring before a typical career has even begun seems to be the goal.

I guess we can conclude that retirement is a fluid idea and one defined by the person experiencing it, which is the point of this post. 

I'm pretty sure that all of us enjoy reading how others have done something: tackling a problem, making a decision about medical care, deciding where to live, hiring a personal trainer (!)...almost anything open to individual responses and decisions.

At least for me, I learn something every time a comment presents a new way of living, a different approach to something, or a fresh interpretation of what satisfies someone. 

So, here is your chance to help us all. What does a satisfying retirement mean to you? 

  1. How do you define a lifestyle that is satisfying?
  2. How have you changed your view on this issue over the last few years?
  3. Is retirement still a valid concept?
  4. What is the difference between a satisfying retirement and just being retired?
  5. Can a satisfying retirement include going back to work, either full or part time?
  6. If you have not retired yet, do you still believe you will be able to and be happy?

OK, your turn. Please don't feel compelled to answer all these questions, just the ones that mean the most to you. I am not going to answer from my perspective at this time, though I may take your comments and turn them into follow-up posts. I really want to get a sense for how you are mentally handling the re-positioning of retirement. What leads you to believe that you can craft a retirement that is satisfying? 

I get a strong sense that a majority are comfortable in where their life is at the moment. But, that doesn't include everyone, and it certainly doesn't mean a retirement that looks anything like the one your parents lived.

Fire away...and fill the page!


34 comments:

  1. A satisfying retirement is one where I feel I have an important mission. For me, life without goals is just marking time -- and my most unhappy years were those between "missions." Right now my job mission (71 and still working full time) is to help college students not born into elite or rich families to qualify for and succeed at a good marketing job.

    I recently started a blog SeniorDefender.net that may (in a couple of years) turn into my first mission in retirement. Or maybe some other mission will attract me. But I can't retire until I have at least one.

    I've found that older people without jobs are easily lumped in a "senile" box by our ageist society. (E.g., my pharmacy started sending me robo calls the day I turned 70 to refill my prescriptions. When I said it was insulting, they said "some of our customers can't remember anything." But their unstated premise was once you turn 70 -- that's what you become.

    While we can't control what others think, having a mission or goal in what you do at least gives you mental strength to shrug off other perceptions and not let them affect your sense of self or self-worth. I see too many seniors shrink in self confidence as they lose the validation of a job.

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    1. I like the concept of mission. It is like having a passion, but that word may scare some people. I took a look at your blog. I think you are off to a great start.

      Ageism is a real problem for our society. I support your pushback at the pharmacy.

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  2. A satisfying retirement to me is the one Deb and I are living right now:

    1. We are fortunate that we can travel extensively, up to five months out of the year, and while what we do may not be to everyone's liking, it works for us.

    2. We live in an area of TN we love; again, no one size fits all but it works for us.

    3. Financially we have ourselves set up to weather most storms, if that is even possible.

    4. While neither of us work I am able to "make" money trading in the markets, and share that bounty with local charities we feel strongly about.

    5. Our daughter is doing well and we are able to do things for her that allow her to do more than she could otherwise (vacations, etc) at her stage in life. It also means she will have good memories of us when we are gone, rather than just giving her money upon our demise. Hopefully both can happen, but we enjoy helping her now in different ways.

    6. We still have our health generally-speaking, although I do notice changes. At 64 we aren't doing too bad.

    I guess what I am saying is that when I look at what our lives are right now, we have a pretty satisfying retirement going. I suppose that is largely of our own making since we made a lot of conscious decisions over the years to put us in this scenario, but we have also had a dollop or two of luck thrown in there for good measure. I am going to guess that you and Betty feel much the same way, Bob.

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    1. Your first sentence says it all: the life you are living now is a satisfying retirement. You have been at this long enough to understand that "living now" is the key. Things change over time and we must adapt o what is out situation in the present to stay satisfied. You and Deb have done so.

      Yes, Betty and I are quite satisfied at the moment, too. Both of us are trying new things, following up on earlier goals, and enjoying the blessings we have. We know we could be one moment away from a radical change so we try to enjoy today to its fullest.

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  3. Of course you can go back to work ... or not. The point is (as you've emphasized so well over the years) to fashion a lifestyle that fits YOUR interests, proclivities and passions, rather than being forced to fit your lifestyle into someone ELSE'S (parents, kids, boss, whatever) priorities. Step 1: Figure out what your interests, proclivities and passions really are. Step 2: Go follow them. Sounds easy, right? But (and maybe this is why we all blog) not always so.

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    1. Thanks, Tom. Yes, we are on a unique journey that only feels right once we fully embrace that reality.

      BTW, I enjoyed your most recent article for USNews. Readers, check it out: https://bit.ly/2waSDfr

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  4. My job is being eliminated by March 2019 and I will be 65 so ready or not here comes retirement. My wife recently retire after 20 years as a high school art teacher. She has a studio in our house and can do her ceramics, art, etc. Financially we should be OK even with two grown daughters that need help form time to time with the costs of kids,etc. My concern is I have no hobbies and leaving work has me concerned. (especially when I am not deciding the timing) I have been spending time reading many of the retirement blogs and see the struggles some have encountered. My wife and I are used to our 8 to 5 space so that will also be an adjustment. Just read the book "65 things to do in retirement" which I found very insightful. (Bob you have a piece in that book.) I am starting to put together a retirement plan for myself and discussions with my wife on her vision also. Don't know where we will end up but at least seeing what others have experienced helps. Thanks for your blog it helps a lot.

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    1. I glad you found me an are getting some guidance and support from these pages. Finding meaningful ways to fill your time is one of the most important steps to turn a simple retirement into one that is satisfying and fulfilling.

      Yes, I have pieces in that series, 65 things, 70 things, 80 things. So far they haven't ask me to contribute my thoughts about what I will be doing in my 90s. Looking forward for the 80's book was enough of a challenge!

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  5. I am 68 years old and am in the process of retiring from a small CPA firm in which I was a partner since 1985. I am in decent health and love hunting, fishing, traveling (visited all fifty states with my family, sixty-one countries and all seven continents), visiting family and friends, am a life-long Bama football fan a (19 year season ticket holder), love to cook most major cuisines, read and be around my best friend (wife).

    I studied retirement for nine years (have over twenty books on retirement) and have kept up with several retirement blogs. We are in pretty good shape financially and been blessed more than we deserve. My wife has a nice federal pension, I will be waiting until I am 70 to collect SS while we are able to live off the short term retirement of the merger that we just went through.
    1. A satisfying lifestyle to me is one that affords me the opportunity to continue my passions, pick up a few new hobbies and not have to work anymore. It goes without saying that I would like to have continued good health for my sweetheart and me.

    2. There has been no change in my view of a satisfying lifestyle in the last several years.

    3. Absolutely.

    4. Attitude, Health and your spiritual relationship.

    5. Yep. Hopefully it is not a forced situation. I don't have a problem with someone working some during retirement and still calling themselves retired. I do have a problem with a person that has decided to live a very frugal life style, working odd jobs or part-time and calling himself retired. I consider that person to have just made a lifestyle of frugal living. I don't have a problem with that; however, I don't consider him retired. Just my opinion, for which I am not charging - since it is just an opinion.

    6.Yay!!! This is not applicable to me anymore.

    Since I am taking the time to type this I would like to mention a few things (some of which you have discussed in previous blogs) that I am noticing about MY retirement:

    A. My wife was retired for eight years before I retired this Spring. We have had a few serous discussions regarding scheduling, her personal time, who would do what and when, free time, together vs separate time and who was the boss. I won almost all of the discussions that we have had. I said "Yes Mam" and she agreed. That only took about a month for me to properly understand my position and how the system was to work. Seriously, we did have a few of the discussions a few times and we did compromise. She, unfortunately, had a few of her friends warn her about how I would come in and want to change things as their husbands did. I am happy to report that we have worked most things out fairly well.

    B. I am also trying to get back into some of my old hobbies and pick up a few new ones. I want to write about my early family life, my family and interesting experiences of raising my children. I had a fried do this and his family has told me that it is considered one of their most precious memories of their Dad. I am doing OK in these areas (e. g. painting, learning a foreign language, etc.)

    C. One of my most disconcerting feelings since my retirement is that I keep experiencing this feeling that Monday is coming soon and I will need to get back to work. I have been told this too will pass.

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    1. I think you may be my new idol! Your first paragraph of what you like, what you do and what you have experienced is the perfect description of one person's satisfying retirement. I venture to guess you are rarely bored.

      In your supplemental list I can't emphasis enough how important your point A is in maintaining a healthy relationship after retirement. The #1 complaint of retired women is how their spouse acts after "moving home." Like you, this Robert did not try to change the efficient system my wife had used for years. We had a few rough patches to work out, but things have operated well for the past 16 years (the first 2 required some work on my part).

      Thank you for your excellent recap of your answers and additional thoughts. I'm happy you took the time to do so.

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  6. I have been retired for a few months and have settled into a good routine of not having (much of)a routine! However, my husband will be retiring soon so I do wonder how that will change. He is looking forward to doing some volunteer work and we have several travel plans in the works. But it will be interesting to see how the day-to-day goes. I used to dread Sunday nights as that meant that Monday was next - however, now I love Mondays....and Tuesdays.....and Wednesdays......!

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    1. My favorite day of the week used to be Saturday but that horrible Sunday evening was just around the corner. Now, Monday is the day I really look forward to: a whole, fresh week to do things.

      Have hubby read Robert's comment above (point A). It will make his transition much smoother!

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  7. Great topic for the blog...
    My husband and I have been retired for just over one year. It was a year of change; leaving our careers, selling our home, downsizing, moving, and settling into a community that we had vacationed to for 3 decades. It's been amazing! We seriously tracked our financials for 5 years, took 18 months to move including home spruce up and downsizing goods to our grown children, reestablished ourselves in our new community,and have enjoyed the change of seasons, the change of holiday traditions, and the change of a new routine. We have never been bored and I am amazed at how full life is after our "careers". My husband and I are very project oriented and create daily lists to keep us motivated. We enjoy home improvement projects and lots of trips to the local hardware store for supplies. However,we have our own seperate time-he is out fishing and I am sewing. It took us the first 6 months to get our new financials in order and settle into a new routine. I feel journaling or notebook logs were really helpful and created a sense of accomplishment and reward. We believe in all things "in balance" daily chores, good exercise, social time with friends, volunteering, life long learning with a book club, daily online newspaper etc. Enjoy the opportunity of this new phase in life and I believe it is a different journey for each of us. Much to be said for an open, optimistic, and outright passion for this new chapter.

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    1. What a positive comment. You and hubby have taken this phase of your life and are making it exciting and fulfilling. I like that you spent 18 months to prepare for and make the move to a place you know and love. Too many folks rush that move before they have even settled into any type of retirement routine.

      I totally agree in the concept of balance. Too often during our working life that wasn't possible. In retirement, it is.

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  8. We've been retired now for five years, and my answer to your question now is completely different than it would have been been we retired, or even just two or three years ago.

    The greatest thing I've learned in the past five years is "know yourself." Who you were in your past, what you liked in your in your pre-retirement life probably have a greater influence that we may initially realize. Yes, there is time to try new things, and re-order how or when you do things, but at the root of everything you are still the same you were before retirement.

    Last year our son said my husband and I were "restless people" but that he hoped we would eventually be able to settle down again. At first I thought the remark was strange - we had "settled down" in Portland for nearly 23 years, and put down deep roots in the community. And yet, when I thought about it, he was right about the restlessness. Portland was the longest we had ever lived in one place. When Brett was in the navy we moved every two and a half years and had actually counted that as a positive. We liked going new places and although it was always hard to say good-bye we also enjoyed making new friends and finding our place in a new community. Brett deployed A LOT so was constantly on the move, and we lived in government housing, and although we didn't know it at the time, we actually liked not being tied down by ownership or responsibility for the upkeep and maintenance that goes along with home ownership. After Brett retired from the navy though we kept thinking we needed to settle down, to buy a home, etc. and we did. But our underlying restlessness never went away - we were always ready to go someplace, to start new, and after we retired we did by moving to Kaua'i.

    We've spent an amazing four years here on Kaua'i, but with our youngest heading off to college, we're embracing our restlessness again, and are setting off next week on 15 months of being nomads. We've sold all but 1000 pounds of our belongings, and will live out of suitcases that weigh no more than 44 pounds for over a year. We've set up ways to communicate with our family while we move around, and set up places and stops for all of us to spend time together as well as see old friends. We've divided tasks between us according to interests and our skill sets - I'm a great planner and organizer, and Brett is great at maintaining paperwork and making sure we're where we need to be when we need to be there. After over 40 years together we still greatly enjoy each other's company, and make a good team.

    I think being satisfied in retirement is knowing yourself, and knowing what you enjoy and what YOU want to do, not what others think you should do or what you need. There are factors, such as health or finances, that can limit those things, but there are always ways of discovering and accepting what makes YOU happy in retirement, whether that's starting a new hobby, or traveling, or living near family or settling deeper into your own home and community. It also means respecting the choices that others make - there are no rules for creating a satisfying retirement, and everyone's is different. There's no "right way."

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    1. Those who read your excellent blog (The Occasional Nomads) know of your upcoming big adventure. I hope you and Brett will be able to keep the blog going as you explore the world. That much travel is something Betty and I could never do. We found that two months away from home in an RV was our limit...not even close to 15 months!

      As you make clear, there is no right way to put together a satisfying retirement. It has to be a personal journey. I am with you 100% about knowing yourself, and that is a constantly evolving discovery. Like you, what makes me satisfied today is different from 5 years ago, and will probably be different in another 5 years. We'll see.

      Betty and I will be in Portland in about 12 days but I guess we will miss you. The very best of luck on your adventure.

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  9. My father retired at 55 . They lived in a house on the side of the Phoenix Mountains. Mornings were for reading and writing outside. Afternoons were spent in the library poetry section or St Vincent de Paul. He fished in Colorado four times a year, sponsored a week at the beach for family who lived near and traveled overseas when something struck him. Personally, it is the retirement I aspire to. It really is not that different from my grandfather's retirement.
    We live in a comfortable house. It is our 14th house (10 rented) in our 37 years. We are not attached to houses- or even locations. We have a set amount "in the bank" to let us know we can be comfortable in the life we choose. Is it what we envisioned? Not really sure what we expected.
    I garden and can (my mother thinks I am nuts) and spend time with the grands. I no longer crave lots of travel- although we will be going to the Middle East next year (and am happy to read about Laura's adventures). I don't even really crave people to hang out with. I do volunteer in a food pantry. My husband and I spend loads of time together, and apart. We trade cooking and cleaning (no one likes to do floors:) ) We have always been independently dependent- the Army taught us well.
    My retirement is full of reading, sitting outside and just being unscheduled. Will this continue for years and years? Maybe. Like our choice to move pretty often, there will be another reason and season. I plan to leave no mark except my love for my family. It is a satisfying retirement to me. Four years of working on letting go of envy, worry, jealous and owning stuff has brought me to this point. I pray they do not return! I love my life.

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    1. "I love my life." Who could ask for anything more.

      I also like the "independently dependent" phrase. I think that is a good description for Betty and me. We have separate projects and interests, but share a love of family time. Occasionally, we will talk about moving out of the desert heat, but after 33 years I don't think that is likely.

      Betty has taken a major step in a new direction in the last few months. Up until June she had been very heavily involved in major projects for our last three church over a 10 year period. They tended to consume 9-10 months of each year. Most involved woodworking and construction of large props. They took over most of her time, energy, and two stalls of our garage.

      She has decided that the stress and physical demands were wearing her down. The last three months she has taken on a few house and home or family oriented things that leave her much more time to just be. But, I think she is still struggling a bit to find the proper balance between projects and relaxation.

      Once the weather cools she wants to start working on several outside projects. I hope she finds the type of balance you describe.

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  10. I am almost dreading retirement. I am 65 and may retire next year from a job/career that I have always enjoyed. I have lived alone for over 30 years and have supported myself with my meager earnings. I developed cancer last year, fought the battle and won...I think! I am a very happy and satisfied woman and hope to move closer to my children and grandchildren. However, I did not plan well in advance and whatever people say...two CAN/DO live cheaper than one! I have no complaints although I wish, in hindsight, I had realized that retirement age was upon me sooner than expected. My mind tells me I am forty something. I often believe I am of a small minority of retiring people that will find their retirement years full of struggles financially. It is most certain I will not be traveling anywhere, as my SS benefits will be my only source of income. My hopes are to sell my house, pay off debts, and find a small travel trailer I can buy with the proceeds of my home, park it in a decent RV park and live there. I am accustomed to living a minimally lifestyle and find happiness and gratifying purpose in myself and others. My lack of funds in my waning years does bring bother to my otherwise pleasant outlook. I have not struggled financially much in my prior years and wish I had planned better. 'Going it alone' and depending on myself for everything has been my way of life for ever it seems and now it seems the REAL struggle (financially) is upon me. I implore upon my children to 'plan' better than I and look at their futures (financially) in a different light than myself. I often think I should find a website that might address some of the complications that I will be facing financially as it seems this one and Seniors Living are more geared to those with partners and will not be depending exclusively on SS benefits. Blessing and good luck to all! Great questions, btw!

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    1. I have written a few posts about those who retire and have financial struggles and what retirement and being single looks like. Thanks to your comment I will put some more posts about those subjects on my to-do list. One thing I can tell you: struggling financially or living off Social Security is not uncommon. 43% of singles depend on SS for 90% of their income. You are not alone. And, you have a plan involving a change in housing, paying down debts, and embracing a lifestyle you enjoy.

      I am 69 but think of myself somewhere in the mid 50's. It is not possible I will turn 70 next May! Our mind plays tricks on us all the time.

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    2. I have often observed that we age normally until we turn 35 and then we stay there (in our minds of course). I think this is why for most of us retirement age suddenly arrives, seemingly out of nowhere.

      Don't let all the talk of "You are only as old as you think you are" fool you. It's a nice thought, and stay active, but you are getting older all the same so plan for it. It happens to us all.

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  11. I love how everyone really has discovered that satisfying is really individualized. I love the statement "to each their own". A lot of days I don't accomplish a thing! And this is so wonderful to not have to. Watching ID discovery for 10 hours and whipping up chocolate chip cookies for lunch yeh. (Not every day :) ). Days of reading, traveling around the US when I'm in the mood, (I've done 6 15 day Amtrak passes and have discovered hostels!) I have been so fortunate in that I'm an RN and have a pension and still work what's called intermittent which means they can call me for shifts and I can say yes or no (picking up less and yes) but if I feel like another trip etc. it makes it more appealing. I guess what I really like is not having to do anything. Lest anyone think I'm isolated or lonely I have four kids and 12 grandkids within 8 miles (and my youngest are in their twenties and have not started families). Wowza for sports and band concerts etc....... I guess I do have one thing I do is babysit every tues. Daughter in law is a social worker one day a week (to get a break from the 6 kids:). But she has back up for when I take off. I did go to Ireland last fall with youngest daughter. I gues what does make a difference for me is that although I'm only 64 I've been a widow for 23 years so it's just me deciding things. Well I better quit. Cold Justice is coming on.

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    1. I love train travel though it is becoming harder with each passing year to do it on Amtrak. Phoenix lost train service almost 20 years ago so I have to really want to take a trip to make it happen.

      Four kids and a dozen grandkids close by and you still can do nothing if you feel like it. That is tremendous. Clearly, you have excellent time management skills and the ability to say "No" when required.

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    2. I love JRE's post and her version of retirement is what I'm shooting for (minus grandkids). I won't have any grandkids but that's okay. I do want to work but only part time. The papers go in this year!

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    3. I've been retired 5 years now so my big travels are not that frequent. When I first told the kids I was "backpacking around the US on Amtrak" they thought I'd lost it but are used to it now. I've hit every major city including Vancouver and Montreal! And Seattle, San Francisco and Boston my favorites several times. Last winter I hit Chinese lunar news year in SF and Mardigras in NO. Surprisingly I have never felt scared navigating big cities by myself. I don't use sleeper cars as not in my budget. So I've learned helpful things to bring for comfort and have met many interesting people. I'm just now investigating a cross country Canadian trip but it does not look easy! (On the VIA train). It will be out of my comfort level which at times is good for you. I felt that way the first step onto Amtrak but I told myself and the kids if I don't like it I'll just go to an airport and fly home. Yes there are times I say yes to family things that I'm like shoot, but then usually I'm glad I did. I'm learning grandkids like children grow up too fast. Summer in this area gets tough in that there were 8 games a week, baseball, soccer and softball. Now we start football for two, swim team, soccer, and volleyball for three others plus band, orchestra, choir, etc. .... I go often but yes I do say no once in awhile. I once read something like being retired is like being a teenager again except not having a job, school or having anyone tell you when to go to bed. Not that bad!

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    4. I have traveled from Greenwood, Mississippi (via Chicago) to Salt Lake City by Amtrak and I loved it!

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  12. I aim for balance with myself, home, family, friends, and community at large. Each day is a mix of doing something that needs doing and wants doing. I'm guided by seasonal demands. I'm more of a homebody than a nomad. Most of my travels have very strong social connections. My days are bookended with reading, something that I did at bedtime in my working life. I am still not over the slow mornings and not "punching the clock". I'm 5 years into retirement and it's a satisfying one.

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    1. Honestly, when it is 9am on a weekday and I just about to shower after reading the paper and having coffee I feel guilty that it will be 9:30 before I am ready to be "productive." Silly, I know, but even after 17 years it is a hard habit to break.

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  13. I have just reached my one-year anniversary of being retired. My situation may be a little different since it wasn't my decision and my job decided to "retire me." I also just reached my two-year anniversary of being a widow. I had a wonderful husband and we were married for 36 years. He was always a good provider for me and our 6 children. Most of his career he worked for small companies that didn't offer retirement and everything we earned pretty much was literally eaten up by our 5 boys and 1 girl. I retired from a church after 20 years and I have no retirement.

    However, my story isn't a woe is me story. Fortunately, I have no debt. Through what can only be called a series of miracles all my debts have been paid since my husband passed away including his hospital bills after a bilateral lung transplant and my home. From all the research I've done one would probably conclude my financial state not good and I will admit at first, I was terrified. Surprisingly It hasn't been bad at all. I certainly can't say that I've wanted for anything. All my needs are met. I have lots of friends and we go out to dinner often. Most of my social life already revolved around church and there is plenty going on there for me to do. I'm writing a book and have a little blog. I have 2 dogs to keep me company and will go take a month-long trip to North Carolina in a couple of months to welcome a new grand baby and visit lots of family there.

    Grief is hard, much harder than I ever realized and there have been many days acclimating to my new life hasn't been easy, but I would say retirement is a blessing. I think it's all about being content and grateful. Time is a rare gift. To me that's what retirement is. The gift of time.

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    1. I am so sorry for your loss. Regardless of how well your one-year old retirement is going, what you have been through must have put any well laid plans into a major upheaval.

      That being said, what an uplifting story, Sherry. Anyone who wonders if he or she can come back from a major crisis need only read your words to understand the power of faith, attitude, perseverance.

      Blessings to you and your family. I wish for you only the best experiences going forward.

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  14. I think, not surprisingly, that what makes my retirement (one year next month) so satisfying is being able to call the shots. Many people have longer careers than I did (about 32 years) but combined with school I spent 50 years on someone else's schedule. Now I am on mine.

    Not to say there aren't busy days with some level of commitments. But they are commitments I or my wife have chosen to make, not commitments made for me by a teacher or boss. I meet up with my old work friends occasionally, and while I like to keep up with the goings on there, I do not miss being on their set schedules one iota.

    Things are beginning to get a bit busier now after almost a year. We have been helping relatives with some home improvements, helping elderly former neighbours with some errands, visiting friends as mentioned above. I have joined the local historical society. We do still have the occasional day of doing next to nothing, which remains a wonderful freedom.

    Most interestingly, to me at least, I have signed on to be a local "ambassador" for a large retiree organization. I will be spreading the word about the benefits of the organization and helping with retirement seminars for public sector employees in my area that are approaching that milestone in their lives.

    The important thing with all of this is, again, that I will pretty much set my own schedule. Giving up too much of that lovely newfound autonomy would be contrary to my own satisfying retirement.

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    1. Control is the core attraction of retirement, I think. Control over time, commitment, schedules, who and what you align yourself with, who you help and who you don't. That type of selection can't happen nearly as often when a job or similar commitment calls so many of the shots each day.

      Getting that control (or sometimes the illusion of control) back is what sets retirement apart from any other stage of life. And, then control equals freedom...not freedom from all responsibility or obligations, but freedom to craft large portions of your time in a way that becomes deeply satisfying for you.

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  15. I love reading everyone answers to your questions. My retirement might appear quite boring from the outside, compared to others who are traveling and doing more exciting things. But my life suits me perfectly. I am very much a homebody after spending so much time traveling and living overseas in my earlier years. I'm grateful that all my kids live in the area so I'm close to my grandchildren. My adventures these days are more "internal." I lead a contemplative group twice a month that bring me much enrichment. My life feels full and I am content and grateful.

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    1. Yes you are. You are one person I know who is very comfortable in her own skin and with who you are.

      Betty and I will see you soon!

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