April 3, 2014

What Is Going On? Is This a Trend?




In case you missed it, Early Retirement Tamara has decided to stop blogging. In fact, the one she posted a few days ago is her last. I love her and husband Mike as friends and have been inspired by their approach to retirement. I don't know many who have their physical energy and desire to continually challenge themselves. I will miss reading of their adventures.

Betty and I will join them for a few days in our RVs in Tucson in a few weeks. But reading her blog posts on a regular basis has been fun. I will miss them.

On the same subject, Barb at Living Richly in Retirement is likely to stop blogging about retirement, too. Go to her most recent post and add your thoughts - she is looking for feedback on what to do next.

Dear friend, Galen Pearl, stopped blogging last fall. I still miss her words but have her as a dear friend for life. Another close friend, Barbara Torris, shifted her blog from strictly retirement to more of a lifestyle approach a year ago.

Two years ago Bill Birnbaum exited the retirement blogging field, too, but not before Betty and I had the chance to share time with Bill and wife, Wendy, for a few days at their home in eastern Oregon.

And, I broadened my focus a bit this year to include subjects that aren't so neatly put in a retirement pigeonhole after feeling I had run out of fresh things to say on such a narrow path.

So, I must ask a question: Is retirement a subject that no longer needs to be written about full time? Has retirement changed so much that it no longer makes sense to blog about it exclusively since each of us develop a unique path through this phase of life - in a sense writing our own story each and every day?


Or, are the recent changes in the retirement blogging landscape simply an example of the inevitable life cycle of everything? For a start there will eventually be an end. New retirement bloggers are out there ready to join our lives.

Is retirement no longer a subject worthy of a full time focus? That does seem to be a legitimate question.



59 comments:

  1. I think retirement is a subject worthy of FT focus colored by all the aspects of living, i.e. lifestyle, social and political issues, homemaking, travel, health, relationships, entertainment. Retirement doesn't exist in isolation of this life we're living.

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    1. The topic of retirement is much broader than it was for my parents' generation. Then, you moved to Sun City and played golf or watched TV. I can't even imagine trying to blog about that for more than a few weeks!

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  2. Oh, I hope not! As a faithful reader, I look forward to checking out several blogs & their comments each day; while I appreciate the expanded information, the retirement focus is the draw for me.. Maybe my answer is that I enjoy your mix. I must admit that it is probably easier to read than to write for several years.
    pam

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    1. This June will mark 4 years. The average life span of a blog is under three, in fact many never make it past 30 days. A blogger needs to like to write, build relationships, and have a topic that doesn't get stale. So, far I am doing fine!

      Thanks, Pam.

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  3. With so many people entering retirement daily, Bob, I would vote that it is certainly worthwhile of a concentrated blog site. There will always be some attrition as people lives and desires change, so to see some good folks stop writing their own sites is no indictment of the need by many to read your postings. Of course it is entirely up to you, but I would vote for 100% retirement articles.

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    1. The thing I have found so fascinating about retirement over the last 46 months of writing this blog is how unique each person's approach to the process is and the interest in subjects that I would not have been so closely related to retirement.

      The retirement bloggers I really wonder about are the ones who concentrate solely on the financial aspects. How many times can one write about 401(k) and investments?

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  4. I can see the headline now… Retirement bloggers retiring from retirement blogs.

    I think it’s tied up in several things. The first as you note, is that there is a cycle for everything. For every start there will eventually be an end. No one will be able to write on, or be interested in, whatever topic forever.

    Secondly blogging is a relatively new thing and essentially anyone can set up and start a blog. While some make money for the most part it’s an accessible internet “hobby”. While I imagine it’s gratifying to see that others are interested in what you have to say after a while playing with the same train set every day can get a little tedious. Kind of like going into work every day, it stops being an interest and starts becoming a job (and a low or no paying one at that). Plus the bloggers themselves are retired – doesn’t retirement mean you no longer HAVE to do anything?

    Thirdly boomers are voracious consumers of everything “self-help”. From Jane Fonda workout tapes to Zoomba, the Akin diet to Wheat Belly and on every other topic imaginable, not to mention all the self-help material on saving for retirement. I think previous generations just sort of went along doing the best they could with diet, exercise, saving and retirement but not boomers – they want to make “informed choices” and so it is with retirement.

    I think the confluence of the ability to blog, a huge number nervous of boomers looking for help to move into retirement, plus some early boomers with the time and energy to blog on a topic they have experience with – it all adds up to an explosion of new entrants to meet the demand.

    Of course self-help is all fine and good when you have time to work on whatever it is you need to improve but, if you are what you eat, by this point most boomers have pretty much become what they’ve eaten. And so it is with retirement and bloggers. For the first of the boomers to retire it was scary, exciting and new but for them it’s much less so now. They’ve done it, documented their experience and now have settled into a retirement routine. It seems obvious that there will be a lot less new to write about when it has become routine.

    Is retirement no longer a subject worthy of a full time focus? It will still interest people, especially those moving into retirement and the topic will need a bit of refreshing from time to time but the basic principles will remain. As there is no shortage of “new mom” or “saving and investing” books/articles/blogs there will always be an interest in “what is retirement like” though now there is a body of “boomer” experience available to draw on.

    That said, it’s a personal journey for each of us, to know and understand another’s path can be, and is, helpful. (I still check in most weeks to see how you’re doing so if only for me keep it up!)

    - David

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    1. Up until the first of this year I keep this blog very much on the straight and narrow: the topic had to relate directly to some part of retirement. Since January, I have spread out a bit and written about subjects that have been a bit more universal. Also, I cut from three to two posts a week. As you note, I began to feel like blogging was a job and a requirement.

      I don't make much money from all this, certainly not enough to continue if it were a chore. So, for the moment I am comfortable blogging about retirement, but a bit more of a personal journal about my retirement, rather than continuing to preach to the choir about the same half dozen subjects.

      Interestingly, the page views have gone up since I cut to two posts a week and broadened the focus. From that I conclude that a tight focus and fresh content every 48 hours was wearing thin.

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  5. Hey Bob, I enjoy reading your retirement blog. We have limited funds so it's quite fulfilling to read others accounts of their activities and see photo's of places I would like to go from a real persons perspective rather than a tourism site, they tend to only tell all the positives, from your blog and others we get the real outlook.

    Sorry to hear the others have "retired" their blogs, hope yours doesn't get to be more of a chore than a pleasure. Keep up the good work.

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    1. Thanks, Nancy. I do like to feature other people's lifestyle decisions and what they do in retirement. That's what made the last book so enjoyable to pull together.

      Maybe I should ask for folks who would like to share part of their story on this blog to contact me. That would be interesting for all of us to read as we walk this path together.

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  6. Yes, I think it is a VERY worthwhile subject. Really like your style and mix of topics. And just passed your blog along to a relative who retired last week (along with a copy of Ernie Zelinski's book.)

    BTW, you may be a "bad influence." Thanks to a recent post, we're heading up to Dead Horse SP next week. Went to Tombstone & Bisbee last month. As part of our "satisfying semi-retirement" we've decided to hop in the RV once a month and just go someplace. So thanks for the ideas! 73...




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    1. You should really enjoy DHR Park. It is pretty, with plenty of easy hikes, three relaxing lagoons to enjoy, and the Verde River to dip your toes in. Another one to put on your must-see list is Fools Hollow State Park in Show Low. The RV sites overlooking the lake are especially nice.

      An RV should be "exercised" on a regular basis anyway...you might as well turn that into a pleasant escape.

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  7. I enjoy the variety of your posts which INCLUDE retirement issues but expand out into activities, places you visit, music, etc. I think the retirement focus brings readers to your site initially, but as you know, when you retire you have even MORE time to enjoy a colorful life-- and your posts share that,too.

    I think having your older posts about how to make the retirement decision and other pertinent retirement issues, is a real gift..I review them from time to time.

    Hope you'll keep blogging.. I will also miss Tamara and Mike.. they sure kept me motivated for exercise!! Barb in Texas has her unique focus,also and I am hoping she will stay online.

    I would think that "retirement" brings us baby boomers to the sites, where we can then share ALL the life issues and adventures that most of us want to experience at this age... Thanks for sharing Bob!

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    1. You mentioning sharing, which is what Nancy referred to above. That seems like an exciting area for me to explore: real retirees telling their stories. Certainly, your and Ken's journey have graced these pages on occasion. I like the idea of having glimpses into what others do to stay busy and satisfied.

      Tamara and Mike are so amazingly active, frankly, I am kind of surprised she didn't stop quite awhile ago. Blogging takes time - she and Mike don't have any to spare!

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  8. As with any new phase of your life; be it getting married, having children, new job, recovery, retirement, there is much to learn as the phases change you with time and experience.
    The beginnings of retirement are new, amazing, scary, fun, awesome, confusing, and downright incredible. As we get our 'rhythm' we learn and evolve and branch out into new directions.The info we needed at the beginning isn't the info we need 6 mos, a year, two years down the road.
    I imagine it's that way with bloggers. What you want/need to blog about at the beginning isn't what interests you or your readers down the road.
    As the long-timers fade away fresh voices will take their place and take us to new places.It is still comforting to read the articles by the folk, like yourself, who are intelligent, grounded and factual and humorous. The complete package.
    Keep up the good work with your mix of information and personal exploration. And thank you for not posting your week's menus :-) Have a great trip!

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    1. Menus? Never going to happen. Betty and I tend to eat to fuel ourselves so meals are simple, quick, and (mostly) healthy. But, for the blog? No.

      I was recently interviewed by a reporter for a major religious magazine. She was interested in how retirement has changed and how retirees stay satisfied and productive. From the questions her editor had asked her to probe I could tell that person was young. He/she wondered about playing golf all day or becoming bored from lack of anything to do. Obviously, that person's idea of retirement was the one left over from the Sun City retirement days. Hopefully, my words helped clarify the reality of retirement today.

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  9. I think it's difficult to maintain a blog that focuses on one subject exclusively. I pulled the political rants off of my blog, and intend to start a new political blog. It was put on hold temporarily, due to our moving plans. Politics, especially in todays world, won't run out of fodder. And, it helps me to let off steam, rather than have my head explode. ;)
    I think you were smart to branch out and write about other aspects of your life. We all have different interests and experiences to share, and I think that's what makes blogging fun. It also helps to love writing. What makes your blog successful, I think, is your writing and willingness to share your personal experience. You don't preach.
    I quit reading Leo Babuto's (sp?) blog, something about zen, after a few short months even though it was one of the highest rated and regarded blogs at the time. He seemed preachy, in a subtle way, but preachy none the less. He had so convinced himself he was, in fact, THE guru he couldn't stop preaching. He stopped allowing comments, too. How pretentious.
    Haven't heard much about him in a few years. Guess I wasn't the only one who stopped reading.
    Anyway...I believe some subjects are confining, and it's best to mix it up. That way no one gets bored.
    Didn't mean to ramble on...
    b

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    1. I read Leo, too. But, his focus on all things simplicity-oriented did get old for me. I guess that helps make your point. Maybe he was too convinced of his own special insight or maybe he just ran out of ways to talk about downsizing. Like you, I haven't checked in a few years to see if he is still writing.

      I am looking forward to your political blog. I hope you have comment moderation in place and a thick skin.

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  10. I enjoy surfing the net while perusing for retirement blogs that have a variety of topics related to retirement i.e., where to go, what to do, interesting websites to visit, creative writing sites to visit etc.. I would like to hear from the retiree as well, to hear their stories. Maybe I am on to something here, a fascination for what humanity has to say. As I stumble upon this blog, I agree with the previous comment concerning the overload of investing as most people who have retired or are pending retirement already know the ups and downs of the 401k’s or have read the boundless articles championing people to save for retirement. The investment and save strategy ad nauseum has gotten dull, monotonous and so repetitive in nature that I find my myself hitting the back button on my browser for another bog to search.

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    1. The financial subjects are important, but are quite limiting. Once a reader understands budgeting, delayed gratification, investing basics, not trying to time the market, and how to avoid scams, what else do you need? So, financial bloggers need a constant influx of new readers who are searching for this basic info.

      Another vote for more info from actual retirees....There is a trend!

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  11. I think some of the blogs are "blog therapy" and are useful to work through retirement issues. Maybe they have served their purpose after many of the issues are resolved.

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    1. I think you are quite right. I know of a few bloggers who started to work through issues or problems and then shifted focus or stopped. After all, once the wound is healed why keep going to the doctor?

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  12. I read on another blog that blogging for money is sweat-shop labor. I agree with the other commenters bloggers are burning out on the tedium of blogger. As to your subject matter - there will be no shortage of future readers. My mom was forced to retire at 75 two years ago - totally unprepared, my husband is retiring this year and I plan to retire in about 5. Every one of us need your blog to help with the adjustment, figure out the money aspects and to come up with a plan for the second half of our life. Not to mention all the health issues and decisions that come with aging.

    I've also become bored with my own blogging. I can't decide if I want to take it to the next level (self-hosted) or quit all together. I've enjoyed your off-topic posts, especially the book post. Also, I didn't notice you now only post twice a week - not sure what that is saying.


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    1. Not noticing I cut my posts by one-third is actually what I hoped would happen. Most of us are too busy to read a fresh, 600 word post every other day. In tracking comments I noticed that more were coming in for posts that were actually a week or so old. That told me my target just didn't have the time to keep up with so much content.

      By cutting back to Mondays and Thursdays I have given readers a little more breathing space between posts, and taken a lot of the pressure off me to keep coming up with topics that might be interesting to write and read.

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  13. It comes down to what is the motivation of the blogger. If it is to inform and provide information then most blogging sites are poorly structured for that purpose, since they are designed around the current post and time, not subject structured. Combining a blog with a data structured web sites tend to be much more durable since they have value beyond the last few posts and provide good reference sites.

    The blogging sites that last strictly as blogging sites tend to be more current events focused and are around politics, sports, fashion, travel, etc.

    Most blogging sites are about the opinions and experiences of the blogger and while they can be interesting do not fit into the characteristics of the longer lasting categories and the lifetimes are pretty much limited to the energy of the blogger.

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    1. That is a good summary. I have been sort of a blend of information/resource/personal stories so I have had more to draw from. Since I am not in this to make money (though I will take it whenever an advertiser or Amazon sends me a check!) I can just let things evolve as I see fit .

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  14. I love the idea of sharing stories,real life stories of other retirees.. how and why and when they did it.. every one of us is so different.Ken and I had "planned" to retire at 62.Our industry changed and we did too..so we bumped things up 2 years (not very easily, it was a very difficult decision for Ken as you recall!!) But we made it to the other side.. I can't imagine ever being bored.. we have a lot of interests,also enjoy a lot of quiet time, and of course the MOVE we made suddenly, has given us PLENTY to DO!!!

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    1. The idea of some real life segments is intriguing. I liked the way the interviews came together for the book, but can see the idea working well as an on-going series for the blog, too.

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  15. Bob,
    I certainly appreciate your blog and efforts. I hope you are motivated to continue for a time.

    As a long time reader I have noticed that there are a lot of interesting people you know, or have met, or who comment on your blog. With your radio background, have you ever thought of adding an audio component? Maybe interview retirees from varied backgrounds and/or geographical locations about the joys and challenges of retirement or interesting people you and your wife meet on your road trips? With "Call Record" and Skype it might be possible without a lot of production, and it would give you a break from having to produce a written post twice a week. I would find it interesting to have some voices put to names. Just a thought.

    Rick in Oregon

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    1. I have been playing around a bit with the idea of voicing a series of podcasts. I like the idea of interviewing folks we meet on RV trips and including them in some travel podcasts.

      Thanks, Rick. That might be an interesting area to play with.

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  16. I don't see how you can exhaust the subject of retirement, since retirement is life itself. But I can see how people writing about retirement (or anything else for that matter) can get exhausted and just not want to do it anymore. But as for me, to borrow a phrase, I'll keep on truckin'.

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    1. One of the nice things about blogging for personal satisfaction is I can change topics at anytime and still be able to write without worrying about money or Google rankings or any of that stuff. Who knows, maybe I will channel my inner-quilting persona.

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  17. Not being a regular blogger, I do enjoy reading how and what others are doing in retirement. It is no longer about Sun City retirement days. What I enjoy are the life stories, the travel, the hobbies, the pictures! Being from Canada, I do find it interesting when the blogs get feisty about healthcare, especially once retirement comes along. FYI. We are not dying on the streets up here.

    I don't know if we have to blog on a regular schedule. Sometimes an idea hits me and I just want to write. I'm not in this for followers and doubt there will ever be a monetary reward (haven't signed up for that). But it is rewarding to find other like minded people throughout the world.

    My original blog dealt with weight loss and I now have about 15 close friends because of that. 90% have stopped blogging! Mostly at the 3 year mark. We now keep in touch through Facebook, email and a yearly getaway weekend. I truly believe blogging is a personal connection. A way to document our lives. So do what you like, when you want. And mix it up. Makes things more interesting.

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    1. Thanks for your thoughts, Sandy. My wife and I have made several good friends because of blogging, friendships that never would have happened any other way. When I stop at some point, I imagine Facebook or some other social media will be how we stay in touch with each others' lives.

      It is interesting you note the 3 year mark for many bloggers you knew to stop. That is about the average for all blogs.

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  18. I'll miss Tamara's blog for sure! So motivating and exciting to read about all of her adventures.

    Myself, I'm just a year retired, so it's interesting to look back to see how I felt at the time, and how things have evolved for me. An ever changing game, which is a good thing! The insight and inspiration I have received from you and your blog has been wonderful. I hope you are able to continue, but surely understand if you were to grow tired of it all!

    By the way, I DID notice when you went from 3 posts to 2. But so understandable. I don't know how you have kept up the pace for so long. You are so good at commenting on everyone's comments. I think it makes us all feel like we're having a real conversation.

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    1. I really think of the comment section as a way to talk with friends. There are some blogs that don't encourage or even permit comments. While I understand that decision because of spam (I get over 100 spam comments a day) or the time required to read and respond, to me I would never want to be involved with a blog like that. I want to make connections, teach, and learn. Over time we really become like family.

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  19. Bob,
    With so many interesting comments, it's hard to add anything but here goes. Selfishly, I want to continue reading about Tamara and Mike's adventures, but I understand her time constraints. Living life is more important than recording it. I feel fortunate to have discovered a new friend and will continue to stay connected with her.

    Both she and you, along with many others have insight to offer to new retirees and to those of us who have been at it for a while. But, when blogging becomes a burden rather than a hobby, it is time to walk away.

    As to whether there is still a "market" for retirement blogs, I definitely believe there is. Good blogs, with content that is well written, fresh, current and sometimes personal, which is exactly what you provide. It was nice to see you relax a little these past months. Glad your energy is still in it.

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    1. Thanks, Suzanne. You and Malcolm have become virtual buddies through blogging and will certainly see our faces when we can point the RV toward Florida.

      I imagine Tamara will post pictures and updates on Facebook, at least I hope so. Her schedule wears me out just reading it, but it does give me a kick in the butt to just do it. It will be fun to spend a few days with them in the Tucson area in 3 weeks. We have RV spots right next to each other!

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    2. Update - We just confirmed Tamara and Mike for an overnight stay on their way from Ft. Lauderdale to Cocoa in Sept. So looking forward to meeting them. Now, if you and Betty would make your way to Florida, we'd have quite the party!

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    3. I am already thinking of 2015. We have definite plans to be in Palm Springs in January for the Film Festival. Then, we are thinking San Antonio, New Orleans and Florida in the spring, and the Pacific northwest for the summer. It could happen!

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  20. I do find it easier to keep up when you post twice/week, Bob. I'm one of those who has commented when I was able to catch up. As a lurker and infrequent commenter, I have enjoyed following your journey since the Money Mag article. Retirement was the hook for me, since my DH retired a few years ago and I'm still debating when the time is right for me.

    The past two months have been a trial run, as I resigned from a toxic job situation in early February. I love not working and the freedom to do anything any time, but I'm not ready to retire completely. Some of that has to do with my personality, and some involves financial comfort. I have a LOT of energy, but I'm also the money worrier and CFO of our household. DH is more laissez faire, and the balance is good. Many relationships seem to have a spender and a saver, don't they?

    I had a great interview this week and am hopeful I will find one more job that fires me up and carries me into full SS payments. We also have a couple years left on our mortgage, and while we could pay for it without working, I sleep much better not tapping savings. After the past two months without a job, I can see that shifting my mind set from saving to spending our savings is going to be a challenge for me. I watched my dad go through life with a "never touch the principal" mantra, and it's clear it really sunk in. I am not that rigid, and we intend to use some savings for travel while we are still young and fit enough to enjoy it. But the current healthcare situation makes me nervous and I question how one can ever feel they have enough on that front. Medicare has been great for DH...I look forward to getting on board that train!

    All this is to say I enjoy your blog and have enjoyed the broadened focus you took on this year. And the idea of other retiree's stories is an intriguing one. Keep up the good work!

    P.S. I have often thought of blogging, but it seems my favorite bloggers often burn out and I didn't want the added stress of coming up with topics while working a fairly stressful job.

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    1. Some great comments, Hope. Thanks for taking the time to detail your journey.

      I start Medicare coverage on May 1st and am looking forward to that part of my retirement finally getting onto a firm footing. With additional Medigap and Part D drug coverage policies I think I am covered for most anything that life throws my way.

      The "never touch the principal" idea is a tough one to adhere to in today's extremely low interest rate world. Your investments have to be substantial enough that even a few percentage points is enough to live on (with Social Security). I am withdrawing just under 3% at the moment which is less than the account's average return, so I guess I am leaving the principal alone. But, I am not rigid in that regard. If I need to dip into principal for some reason at some point I will do so. I didn't work so hard all those years to just count my stack of coins!

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  21. I think the world is changing. The days of traditional retirement at 55 or 60 are over. I'm a generation X'er, and I must admit I resent the baby boomer generation before me that spreads the message that we are all supposed to retire and put our feet up. I think, as long as you are healthy, don't retire. In fact, I encourage all retired folks to return back to work. Rabbi Lapin said it best: "...never retire...who told you that you could retire?" Even if you are financially set, please keep being a producer rather than a consumer. If you are interested in my thoughts on this, check out this blog post: "Be a producer and never retire." -- http://jasbirtsingh.blogspot.ca/2013/08/be-producer-not-consumer.html

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    1. So, your belief is older folks should never retire and make room for younger workers? I thought one of the major complaints from those in their 30's and 40's that those in their 60's need to step aside. If your advice is to never retire but just keep working until you drop at your desk, how will that help?

      Retired folks who want to return to work do. Otherwise, why do so? There is nothing morally better about working just to pile up more money. Retired people do spend money, do participate in the consumer-driven society we live in. If everyone is a producer and not a consumer, who are you producing for?

      I'm sorry, but your argument makes little sense.

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    2. Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this. I think that if a person is of sound mind and body, and still able to serve their fellow man and contribute to bettering society, then they should. I really don't understand why an arbitrary age such as 55 or 60 should convince a person to put up their feet and be a consumer for the remaining days of their lives. People who are blessed with good health can still live productive lives well into their 70's and 80's. I don't buy the argument of retiring to make room for the younger generation. In fact, I think older workers have a lot of wisdom to offer, not to mention corporate knowledge and experience that can be of great value. If anything, older workers should stick around and mentor the younger staff. Here are some good examples from a recent image I saw on linkedin, "Too late to start?. It's never too late." The image shows the ages and names of the founders of well known corporations - e.g. Ray Kroc started McDonald's at 52, John Pemberton invented Coca Cola at 55, Harland Sanders started KFC at age 65. I would also argue that the hardest job in the world is being the Pope, and Popes rarely ever retire. Only two Popes have retired in the past 2000 years. Even then, Pope Benedict retired in his 80's. My only point is that an able person should continue to work to serve their fellow man. It's not about the money I agree. You can't take money to your grave so no point in piling it up.

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    3. I don't know any retirees of my generation who are content to stop working and put their feet up. That is an image that died several decades ago. Folks who retire today are volunteering their time and skills to help others, they are taking care of grandkids while parents work, they are writing books, they are traveling, they are becoming heavily involved in their spiritual development, and they are starting new businesses.

      Retirees do not stop helping their fellow man. In fact, because of the free time and opportunities I would suggest a typical retiree of today does more to help his or her fellow man than someone still required to work in an office or factory 8 hours a day.

      Thanks, for opening this discussion, Jasbir. It seems to me that your image of what a retiree is and does is not accurate in today's world. Importantly, that incorrect image is too common among younger people or those who have yet to experience the freedom to really live and make the world a better place. Retirement today is nothing like it was even 20 years ago.

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    4. Hi Bob,

      I personally know retirees who do seem to live the kind of consumerist life I described. However, I'm really glad to hear you say that most of the retirees you know are not.

      Thanks for the discussion!

      Jasbir

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    5. Jasbir, I think you are confusing the word retirement with disengagement. People who retire from their life's work usually don't walk away from contributing in other ways. Take SCORE for example, these are retired business executives that are retired, but help others start businesses by providing insight and consultation on a voluntary basis. Retirement takes on many forms and for some, there are periods of down time, but for others, it may mean reinventing one's life purpose. There are too many stereotypes about what it means to be "X" (old, retired, single, gay - fill in the blank!). But, I believe that most of society wants to feel good about who they are and what they contribute and each person does it in their own way. Most ways are not wrong, just different and that makes life interesting to me.

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    6. I can say that I retired one month shy of fifty-one, and made the mistake of going back to work a year later. That choice was a miserable experience. I saw nothing but jealousy, envy and backstabbing by those in executive management and being part of executive management, I had a bird’s eye seat. The politics was worse than I had ever witnessed in my thirty year career. What I witnessed was psychopathic, narcissistic, ego maniacs who were so full of themselves, it was unbelievable to the point of sickening. Their number one priority was not the people who worked hard every day but their own personal agenda. Their philosophy was not to invest in your people and allow them to make you successful and your company succesful. Their work ethic stifled creativeness, discouraged discussion and would ride rough shod over anyone they perceived as a threat to their own personal agenda's. Therefore, I gave it a little over a year and had enough. I am now back to being retired and am completely satisfied with doing what I want and when I want to do it.
      Such as reading this blog at 01:27am. :) Have a wonderful retirement to you all!

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  22. Well, we bloggers are living our lives. Some of us are living them in retirement. I'll bet there are new retirees starting up blogs of their own on the topic. Part of the cycle of life, I'm guessing.

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    1. Yes, I hope to stumble across some new voices...always invigorating.

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  23. Janis @ RetirementallyChallenged.comTue Apr 08, 11:56:00 AM MST

    I too was saddened to see these bloggers retire from the 'sphere, but I also understand that life is a process and it sounds like they have positive reasons for doing so. How great that they are just too busy to blog! There are many of us beginning our retirement-focus blogs so I really do hope there is room for, and interest in what we have to share.

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    1. Perfect...just what I noted in my answer to Linda above: new retirement bloggers. Thanks, Janis for stopping by. I invite readers to take a look at your efforts at RetirementallyChallenged.com.

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  24. Absolutely, it's worth blogging about! Many of us follow retirement blogs as we plan for our own retirements, which may be years away. I do understand that with a full retirement life, a blogger might want to focus on other things or may lose the passion for blogging. But in that case, keep the archives up! I was depressed to see that Tamara took down her blog because there was so much information about parks and activities that isn't available any more. I wish I had taken notes.

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    1. Tamara did have lots of reviews of campgrounds and trips I would have liked to be able to refer to. I wasn't aware it was completely gone. Like you, I wish I had taken notes or printed out the key pages.

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  25. God I hope not! I'm just getting started - both with blogging, and with being "retired." I'm sort of counting on bloggers like you and many others to lead the way!

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    1. Based on the comments so far, I'd say the world of retirement bloggers will continue to produce content for some time to come!

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  26. I think of retirement as work-related and there's so much more to life than work, whether paid or not. I think there are plenty of topics to blog about other than "retirement" for anyone who's reached that milestone. Keep the ideas coming!!!

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    1. It is fascinating to me that after spending over 35 years of my life "consumed' by radio and that whole industry, I give it absolutely no thought anymore. There are too many other things to think about!

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