June 5, 2013

What Time Do You Start Your Day?

One of the questions I get asked on a fairly regular basis is what a typical day of my satisfying retirement looks like. The answer I usually give is there are no typical days. Except for beginning each morning with breakfast and answering blog comments and e-mails, there is no set routine. I have made a determined effort over the last few years to not have my calendar look like it did when I was working.

True, I have a to-do list of things I must or want to accomplish each day:things like reminding me to empty the trash and roll out the cans, refill a prescription, finish a post, water the pots...the basic stuff of a day. But, my calendar doesn't say when when I must do these things. That happens when it happens. 

I have tried a more structured approach: guitar playing from 10-10:30, take out trash at 1:00 and so forth. But, I'd never follow the times listed. Eventually, I realized there was no reason for the tasks to be completed at a certain time of the day so I just dropped that silliness completely.

There is one area, though, that I can't quite get a comfortable feel for: when to get up in the morning. I guess it is part of my personality but I have always believed that the "early bird gets the worm." Over the years, both before and after retirement, I have tried getting up at various times. My body quickly tells me it isn't happy with some of my choices. For a while the alarm went off at 5:00 am. By mid morning I was ready for a nap, which kind of defeated the purpose. I've experimented with 5:30 with similar results. 

I had always heard that older folks (I qualify by now) need less sleep. I have a friend who wake up at 2:00 in the morning and spend a few hours on the computer or reading. Another fellow can't sleep past 4:30. I, on the other hand, am finding I am sleeping later. Being awakened by the alarm just after 6 O'clock seems like the middle of the night. Recently, Betty and I have been getting up sometime between 7 and 7:30 if there is no morning appointment. 

Am I turning into a sludge? Am I missing a few valuable hours each day because I am lazy? Should I follow the old bromide that I can sleep when I'm dead?

Steve Pavlina is a superb blogger, writer, and self development teacher. Among his thousands of interesting articles are several on becoming an early riser. Clearly he is of the "get up before the sun" contingent. He makes it clear he links success in life with being an early riser. 

Two posts of his that I have re-read several times are How to Become an Early Riser Part 1 and How to Become an Early Riser Part 2. He provides specific steps that anyone can take to gain control over the time one's day begins. I read these, feel guilty, and try again to get up early. Each time I cannot pull it off. As he suggests, I go to bed when I am tired but can't master the getting up early part. 

So, my question to you is simple: when do you wake up on a normal morning? Are you the the type that hits the ground running  even before the birds are awake, or do you enjoy a slow start that puts a premium on lingering in bed as long as you dare? Have you found a way to adjust your schedule that works for you? 

Even if every single comment is from someone who has checked the Internet, jogged 5 miles, and read three chapters of War and Peace before the sun comes up, I am not likely to try the early bird route again. But, as the responses in my new book, Living a Satisfying Retirement, make clear all of us have a unique way to make the most of our days. I love to read how others use their time and make the most of their retirement journey.

So, tell us!

56 comments:

  1. I'm a believer that we each have our own biorhythm that effects when we want to fall asleep and when we want to wake up. I know people who are night owls; they have the most energy, do their best thinking and best work late into the night. They tend to wake up later and are slow to move in the morning.

    Others (such as myself) find they are "best" in the early morning hours. When I worked, my alarm went off at 5:00 AM. It didn't feel right. I would be exhausted by the end of the day and frequently went to bed by 9:30 or 10:00. Now, unless there is an extenuating need to wake earlier, I awaken when my body tells me to. This generally is around 6:00 AM. I am not jumping up and raring to go at this time. I slowly ease into the day with breakfast, blog and news reading, and then get ready for the day. By 9:00 I am ready for some physical activity, such as the gym, hiking, etc.

    I think that there is no benefit to trying to force your sleep cycle to something that does not feel natural. To me it seems more important to go with the flow, and wake up when your body tells you to. The rest of the day should flow that way as well. For example, I would never tackle a Sudoku puzzle, exercise, or attempt anything of importance at 9:00 PM. My brain just would not function as well!

    My husband is the night owl. He finds more energy in the later hours of the day. There are times when I envy this. When we are out to dinner with friends, I clearly am ready to call it an evening way before anyone else in our group.

    When I planned for retirement, this was one of the things I looked forward to; being able to awaken and go to sleep whenever it felt best! Mood, energy level and productivity are all enhanced when I listen to my body.

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    1. You are absolutely right, it is all about accepting natural rhythms. I believe one's rhythms can be adjusted over time, but during retirement I guess the question would be, why?

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  2. I like to be out and about by 9 am, so to get my computer and coffee time in, I like to be up by 6 or 6:30. I don't set an alarm. I go to bed around 9 because I wake frequently (that's been going on since my later 30s with no explanation so I've learned to live with it). Most of my daily planned activities are active (skiing, biking, hiking, kayaking or a fun class at the gym) and I find I have the most energy in the morning. If I am home and sitting down in the afternoon, I tend to nod off (which is fine and that's when my cats like to cuddle). I get a 2nd wind around 4:00 and do some of my more mundane "chores" then. Some days, I need to get caught up and spend an entire day on "chores", but I try to NOT make them a priority. I think that because I schedule my outdoor fun activities for the morning, I don't have any trouble getting up in the morning.

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    1. I need more physical activities to get my blood pumping. I quit my gym three months ago because I wasn't making that 10 minute drive often enough to justify the cost. With the new RV I knew we'd be gone large chunks of time so the cost really didn't add up.

      As I read these first few comments, though, I can see that by not replacing the gym with something my body isn't getting the energy boost it needs. With temps now well over 100 every day, I'll have to get creative indoors.

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  3. One of the things that I was looking forward to in retirement was getting up without an alarm waking me. For several working years I had to rise between 2:30 and 3:30 to get to my workplace. Since I am neither a morning person or a night person...this was something my body always rebelled against. I have found I am most productive mid-morning. So, unless there is somewhere I need to be early morning, I set NO ALARM. I get up when I wake up...I find I am refreshed and ready to embrace the day this way. That usually translates to rising between 6 and 6:30. And as a passing thought, being able to do so is still one of my retirement pleasures:)
    :)

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    1. Most mornings our "alarm" is when Bailey jumps on the bed to tell us she needs to go out. Unfortunately, she is rather inconsistent. Sometimes it is 3:30, other days may be 7:30. I wish she had a doggie alarm clock that we could set.

      Like you I am best between 9-11 and 1-4.

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  4. I have always been an early riser. I was wide awake and ready to get the day going about 5:30 to 6am, Now that I am retired, I still get up about 6:30 to 7am. I like to get all my house and garden work done in the morning, Afternoons are for sloughing off--reading, napping, quilting, watching a Netflix movie--before getting dinner made and evening relaxing.

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    1. We have to get up shortly after 6am twice a week during most of the year for church and a Bible study. For the summer that changes and I must admit, I really enjoy NOT setting the alarm for 6:10am !

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  5. Well, I think getting up at 7 or 7:30 still qualifies you as an early bird,Bob!! I tend to wake up naturally around 6:30 if I don't use an alarm.However, my neighbor and I have a new walking program and in order to be out of the Arizona heat we are hitting the pavement at 5 A.M. on Monday and Wednesdays. Only the first 5 minutes are hard..soon as I have a cup of coffee I am ok.I prefer to sleep a wee bit later than that usually!!!

    I tend to fade early..even when I was a young girl I was never one to be up late. I get a lot more done in my early hours of the day..and I love mornings on the patio with coffee, the cat, the pool, the sunrise..

    Ken, when he retires, will definitely be sleeping in till 8 or 8:30.. and he is the "late night" half of this couple!!

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    1. Once or twice this year I have stayed in bed until 8AM...and feel like I've blown the day. isn't that silly? If we are up by 7:00 Betty and I can still eat breakfast and enjoy that colorful backyard she designed before it gets too hot.

      I am thinking of going to a local mall a few times a week for walking. They open early for walkers, giving folks an option to 90 degrees at 8:00am.

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  6. Who says 7 to 7:30 isn't early?! You're up before 10.
    I may set my alarm for 6:45 or 7am. However if I'm in the middle of a good book, I may not actually get up for another hour.
    This varies from summer to winter as it's easier to get up when its light outside.
    Of course just when I think I've got a routine down, I'll be two hours off (in either direction) the next day.
    Thanks for wonderful posts Bob!
    Rose

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    1. Good morning, Rose. Today I was up shortly after 6 because we have a busy morning and then lunch with my dad. I can tell a nap will be required around 1:30 this afternoon.

      It starts getting light in Phoenix at 4:30 this time of year so sometimes it is tough to stay asleep. In the winter when it remains dark until 7:30, sleeping later is our habit.

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  7. Two weeks into retirement today, I can say that 7 AM seems to be the magic time for me to get up. During my last years in teaching, I set the alarm for 5:55 AM. That gave me time to sit, drink my coffee and read the Bible for a good 45 minutes or so before I had to get ready to go to work. Now, I really do the same thing, only it's an hour later and I DON'T have to go to work! My wife still does, so I usually fix her coffee and make breakfast before she leaves about 8:30.
    Fourteen days into this new chapter of my life, and I'm loving it. However, so far it is no different than any other summer. I think it will hit me that it's real when school starts and everyone goes back to work.
    BTW, I didn't anticipate the question, "What are you going to do?" being asked by EVERYBODY! I can't think of a good answer beyond "nothing."
    So far, I haven't had too much time to sit and contemplate my navel; that's what I gather most people think I'll do.
    Jeff in OK

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    1. Jeff...2 weeks retired! How does it feel? As you note you won't fully appreciate the freedom until school starts in the fall...and you don't.

      You have undergone the shift from "What do you do?" to "What are you going to do?" People certainly are curious! Trust me, sometime within the next several months your answer will not be "nothing."

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  8. We are usually up between 5:30 and 6am. We enjoy getting up and opening the patio for coffee etc before the heat of the Arizona Day (especially in the summer)....Morning beofre 7am is spent catching up online, reading, and enjoying coffee and breakfast. Then along comes the busy part of the day. Late afternoons are spent in the rec center pool for a nice cool off. Dinner and usually fairly early to bed. After retirement I tried sleeping later, just didnt work. I guess we all have our own body clocks.
    (Hey Florence above, can you pop over and teach me to quilt please???) Everyone have a great day going to be 111 degrees by the weekend.

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    1. Betty and I are heading to the White Mountains tomorrow...still upper 80's but that is better than 111 in the Valley.

      You have a nice schedule that matches our weather at this time of year. Like you, we like the be on the back patio before the heat drives us back inside.

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  9. I am a believer in listening to your personal rhythms and letting that guide you. I spent a whole lifetime getting up early and running through my day.

    So now I go to sleep when I feel tired and wake up when I awaken...and getting up tends to be, for me, around 7:30 in the morning and that is okay with me. I love the late night and I do some of my best work then.

    It is a good thing too to remove the need to 'get a lot done' in order to feel valued. Enjoying the day does not always involve getting a lot done. Some of my most precious days have been nothing days.

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    1. My wife is a night owl and I am not. She would stay up reading or editing her photos until 11:30-12 midnight every night if she could.

      If she did I would have to go sleep in the RV. By 10:30 I am shot.

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  10. When I worked I got up at 6:45am. That allowed enough time to exercise and get ready for work. I always thought that I would like to sleep until 8am. Now I find that my usual wake up time is between 8 and 8:30. I feel a lot better with the extra sleep. I like to exercise or do yoga as soon as I get up.
    It is great to be retired and pick your own schedule.

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    1. My wife does just fine on about 6 hours of sleep. Less than 7 or 8 and I am messed up. I think I am getting inspired by several of the responses so far to sleep in until 8 and not feel guilty!

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  11. I'm glad you've opened this dialogue. For most of my working life, I have gotten up early to work out, so I could get home, help out with the kids, and get to work. The local YMCA opens at 5AM, so I get up most weekdays at 4:30 and join my friends to hit the gym. I'm home by 6:45 and full of energy, until nap-time during lunch hour.
    We have formed a mutual support community, and encourage each other to show up. We've been doing this for 20 years!!! On the weekends, I get up at 6:30 for a bike ride with my group ( we call ourselves the La Canada Poodles) and I'm back by 10AM to enjoy breakfast with my wife. In my new retirement home, I won't have this kind of (nagging.....er support) encouragement from like-minded crazies.
    Early workouts get the day started and make me feel really good! Also, the discipline has kept me at college-age size and weight and allows me to climb, bike, run, ski and surf with guys 25 years younger. I can pretend that I'm not getting old(er).
    Now I will be greatly challenged to maintain this type of routine. I will be experimenting.....to see if I can rise at about 7, and still have time for an hour or longer workout every day, along with all the other stuff I need and want to do. My dogs will be shocked at how fit they will be...my new running partners!
    When the alarm clock went off at 4:30 AM my mantra was...."If you want to pretend you are SUPERMAN, this is the price you pay for that fantasy" Now we will see if I am still willing to pay that price....or if I can find another answer. Time will tell!
    Dr Keith

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    1. Now, this could be an interesting adjustment for you. You might find your body and mind still need that very early morning boost. I'm sure 7 AM will seem like the middle of the morning after years of 4:30.

      Your schedule is what I have always thought I should aspire to. Those quiet hours, used to boost my energy and keep me in shape are available to me. Unfortunately, except for my stint in the Army I have never gotten up before 5:00AM on a regular basis. I just can't do it.

      For about 8 months I was an part time, one day a week, overnight DJ while I was in college. It was the Sunday night-Monday morning (12mid-6AM) shift. Needless to say I never attended my 8AM Monday morning class and barely scraped through with a D in that class.

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  12. For the first 20+ years of my career as an educator and school principal I had to be at work (school) early. Sometimes as early as 6:30 a.m. No later than 7:30 a.m. The last 7 years I was a District Administrator and had to be in the office by 8:00. I was always there earlier than that. Now, after 3 years of retirement, my wife and I have settled into a routine of getting to bed around 10:00 p.m. or not later than 11:00 p.m. Then we are up in the morning between 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. Seems to work for our routines. I've read that it really doesn't matter much what time we get to bed, wake up, eat meals, etc. What DOES matter is consistency. Studies have shown that medically we are healthier with a regular routine--to bed at the same time, up at the same time, meals at the same time, etc. I don't understand the science behind it but somehow it makes sense that our bodies do better without the "stress" of never knowing from one day to the next what to expect.

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    1. I believe you are correct: our bodies do much better with consistency. I've never quite understood how medical residents can pull a 24 hour shift, be off for 48 hours, and then do it again...for a full year. Personally, I don't want a young doctor working on me near the end of one of those shifts.

      Your schedule sounds like ours: 10-11PM and 7AM. I am really enjoying the variety this post is uncovering, though. Humans are interesting creatures!

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  13. Our alarm lock of working years lives in the guest room. My husband no longer wears a watch.
    Saying that, we usually rise by 6:30 to take the dogs to the lake for a run. After my husband heads to his workshop. I lazily do things until 10.
    Where we really differ is at night. He is in bed by 10 and I research and do corrrespondence often until midnight. Old habits die hard. Those were the hours I always corrected papers or did lesson plans. Creative juices flow at night a habit developed while growing up on the desert.

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    1. I haven't worn a watch for 5 or 6 years, though I will admit I look at the clock on the phone rather often!

      You and Betty would get along. I go to bed quite a bit earlier than Betty.

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  14. Each morning when I open my eyes and look at the clock (which can be between 6:30 and 7:30) I quiz myself. What day is it? This is an important mental exercise for the retiree, figuring out what day it is without looking at the calendar. Once I settle on that, I ask what am I doing today? If I have nothing immediate (most days), I roll over and steal another hour's sleep. So usually I get up between 7:30 and 8:30--a slacker compared to you!

    I wil admit though, on those rare days when I actually get out of bed at 6:30, I love it. By 9am I find myself saying, wow, I have SO much day left! But I can't make myself do that daily. A morning person I am not.

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    1. I will have a post in a week or so about the other end of the clock: evenings. I have 5 hours in a typical night and I'll say, wow, I have so many hours...what should I do!

      Asking what day it is without looking at a calendar - that is a good test. When I used to travel all the time for business I would sometimes have to look at the matchbook or notepad by the bed to remember which city I was waking up in. That was bad.

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  15. I am NOT a morning person and wake up, with the alarm, at 9am. I relax and look at the computer and paper and have my coffee. By 11:00, I'm ready to get going. My husband will retire in a year and he is definitely a morning person, so we shall see how we mesh with our times. :) We're so looking forward to his retirement and are moving into a maintenance free townhome in a couple of weeks. Then our time will be ours and we can go out and take on the world! :)

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    1. Ready to get going by 11AM? Heavens, for me that means lunch time and then a nap! That's what I find so fascinating about posts like this: the answers are so varied.

      You and hubby may have an interesting time meshing your schedules. Keep us posted.

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  16. I have never been a morning person. Not saying I sleep til noon, just don't feel motivated pre-dawn. Sometimes I will get up in the middle of the night (3-4am) to write, if I feel the need. I usually need a long nap that day, though.
    Isn't the whole idea of retirement not having to answer an alarm clock? Maybe it's just me.
    b

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    1. True, retirement allows you to avoid an alarm clock. At the same time, retirement allows you to make the make the best use of your time and energy. I just want to be sure I'm not allowing laziness to dictate when I get up!

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  17. After retirement I started having dinner earlier then staying up until midnight or after and getting up around 8 or 8:30. This would be OK except the time between dinner bedtime is not a productive time for me (especially in winter) and it has now grow to a very long time period. I took me a while to figure out why I never go anything done. So I am struggling to change it. I seem to accomplish so much more when I get up early.

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  18. Isn't it amusing that when we were young we could (and wanted to) sleep until noon and now that we 'could' we 'can't' :-) My REM sleep cycles take me from 11pm until about 6:30 and then I can 'choose' to snuggle with the kitties until 7 or so just to enjoy that luxury. I am only about 2 months into the nirvana that is retirement and still in the 'honeymoon phase' of only doing what I want. So far I've only had to set the alarm clock twice - YAY! I have named retirement a procrastinator's dream. I know that I will get more productive as time goes on but, if I don't, the world won't end.

    Not being married my time is truly mine to enjoy and schedule, or not. The only two things that matter are the grandkids and my cats - the rest of the world comes in a very unimportant third right now, as it should.

    Love your blog and your very matter-of-fact, logical outlook on life and retirement. Thanks so much for sharing.

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    1. Thanks, Catlady, for spending the first part of your retirement with me! Yes, you are in the "honeymoon" phase. For everyone its length is different. Who knows, you may find it lasts 30-40 years!

      Enjoy the grandkids and cats (or dog in our case). They do make life wonderful.

      "The nirvana that is retirement." I like that phrase.

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  19. 7 - 7:30 a.m. sounds like the perfect time to me (b/c that's when I wake up). As for the notion that old people need less sleep ... I'm still waiting. When I was working I found I needed at least 7 hrs. or else I felt kind of jangled. Now that I'm retired, if I don't get 8 hrs. I'm a little shaky.

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    1. We are in the same boat. I need my 8 hours.

      Part of the reason older people sleep less is probably because they can't: insomnia due to pain, stiffness in joints...all the joys of aging that fight against a restful sleep. And, I didn't even mention my 3 trips to the bathroom overnight!

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  20. I'm an early bird for sure. My favorite part of the day is between 5:30 and 7:00 am, when the house is quiet. I luxuriant in the the pleasure of enjoying a mug of coffee while I catch up on my emails and favorite blogs. Including this one!

    By about 7:30 am I'm getting the itch to go running, after which the rest of the day seems to just fall into place. And now that it's summer, Mike and I are looking forward to enjoying our HOA pool and and spa after dinner, right across the street from our house. I confess that if I don't go out for a short stroll or swim after dinner, I'm liable to be in bed by 8:00 am. Not good!

    BTW - here in Hawaii that is translating to a 4:00 am "natural" wake up . . . A bit early, but the bright side is we are catching all the sunrises from the comfort of our condo balcony!

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    1. The 3 hour time difference between California and Kauai can have that effect. The last time Betty and I were on Maui it took us 3 nights to adjust to Hawaii time and another day or two to get fully into Aloha time...which means nothing is rushed and everything happens when it happens! You have to love the Hawaiian attitude toward time.

      Keep those great pictures coming on your blog. If it weren't so far from family and so blasted expensive, I'd be writing this blog, full time, from the islands.

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  21. Given my natual cycles it would be at nine am. Many days the dog does not allow that and they wake me earlier. When that happens I put them out, grab a drink and often go back to bed for an hour, maybe two. I am not consistent about night times and have been known to read until two am as the mood strikes me. I have never understood people who wake up willingly (with an alarm or without) before seven am. lol.

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    1. Has the move to Denver changed your schedule at all?

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    2. Only in that we are in close quarters and so my dogs here my sister at six thirty or seven as she moves and then they wish to move..I still return to bed though even if I do not go back to sleep

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  22. Hi, Bob...

    I get up with the sun. No alarm clock; just the sun. So, obviously, my wake-up time changes with the seasons. This naturally causes my to-bed time to shift accordingly: I get sleepy earlier during the summers and stay up a lot later in the winters.

    Bottom line: my body is doing what feels right for it to do. I wake when I wake and don't try to force it.

    Cheers...

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    1. Since Arizona doesn't observe DST, at this time of year our skies start getting light well before 5AM, so be glad you don't live here if the sun is your alarm clock!

      When we are in the RV, we usually get up closer to 8AM.

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  23. Steve in Los AngelesWed Jun 05, 11:05:00 PM MST

    Hi Bob: I set my clock radio for 5 AM every weekday morning to get ready for work. I usually drag myself out of bed. I go into the bathroom and get dressed. On Fridays, I also eat breakfast before I leave and have lunch out. Monday through Friday, I must be out of my place no later than 5:55 AM to get on the bus between 6 AM and 6:05 AM. On Mondays through Thursdays, I return home at about 8 AM, eat breakfast, prepare lunch, and leave no later than 8:50 AM to get on another bus.

    On Saturdays and Sundays, I do not set my clock radio and sleep as long as I wish.

    When I fully retire, everyday will be like Saturdays and Sundays.

    Steve

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    1. A busy schedule, Steve. I'm sure you are looking forward to the day when the bus schedule isn't the definer of your schedule.

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  24. This topic is of great interest to me so thanks for a fascinating post Bob. Six weeks into retirement (!) I'm thoroughly enjoying waking naturally and easing gently into the day. I relish not setting the alarm clock on a weekday night and trying to guess what the time is, and remembering what day it is, when I wake up.

    Then it's an hour or so in my comfy chair, feet up, looking at the garden and various books, magazines and blogs, checking emails and reflecting in my journal, all accompanied by orange juice and lots of cups of tea, before embarking on the day. It's my favourite time, and having it curtailed by having to go to work was not good! Long may it continue.

    Thanks for your blog. It's fascinating to read about other people's retiring lives, thought the temperatures/climate you enjoy and the RV adventures are rather unfamiliar to this retiring Brit in London.

    Andy G

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    1. My wife and I watch a lot of contemporary British mystery and crime shows on Netflix so I get to see your very different weather and lack of RVs on the highways!

      Your morning routine sounds very inviting. In fact, I think I'll brew a cuppa for my wife this morning-she's the tea drinker in our home.

      During the summer months when most of our various weekday meetings and groups are on break, I rarely set the alarm either. Even if set on a soft classical radio station, that burst of sound is too abrupt for my tastes.

      Thanks for stopping by, Andy, with a comment this morning. London is one of my favorite cities in the world. I love the mix of styles and the vibrancy of the place.

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  25. I have always been an early riser, and I love the quiet of the world in the early morning hours. As I get older, however, I find my body rhythm changing, so that I stay up later at night and get up later in the morning. (Late for me is midnight to go to sleep and 8 - 8:30 a.m. to get up.) Like Alex, I like to get up with the sun, and I think our bodies also respond to the amount of ambient light. (I remember that one year when I was vacationing in Alaska in June, I had amazing amounts of energy and needed very little sleep.) I'm in Maine, where there is a fairly large difference between the length of day in winter and in summer, and my sense is that my body needs more sleep during the winter months. -Jean

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  26. My wife is also strongly affected by the sunlight. We keep the bedroom as dark as possible. Otherwise, when daylight begins just after 4:30AM in the summer she is awake and finds it very tough to fall back to sleep. I am not affected as directly.

    One change I have made within the last few weeks is to start my mornings on the back porch instead of in the living room. It is quieter and I prefer the sights in the backyard at that time of day. Also, it is cool enough to enjoy.

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  27. Bob I was really struck by Jeff's comment about 'EVERYBODY' asking him what he's going to do. In the last almost year and a half I've been saying 'Exactly what I want to.' But I was unprepared for just how many people asked that!
    Rose

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  28. I didn't encounter that question all that often, but I know others are fascinated by what retirees do. Jeff's experience, and yours, are common.

    They are also interested in what RVers do....even my own family doesn't quite grasp the freedom Betty and I feel when we are in our Motorhome.

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  29. 4 years now retired from working the 2nd shift for almost 31 years. I use to beat myself up if I slept past 8am. now its whenever , but never past 9am. I love talking with my wife of 38 years, she needs more rest due to ovarian stage4 and double mastectomy cancers. we enjoy life so much, god is so good! I do like time with god in the quietness of morning.

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    1. Like you, I used to feel I had wasted the morning if I wasn't up and busy before 6:30. There are still two mornings a week where I am up that early for Bible study and church. But, now I am completely Ok with lingering until 7 or 7:30 the rest of the week. When we are traveling in the RV and don't have to leave the campground, we will stay warm and toasty until 8. It feels tremendous.

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  30. I've been retired for 19 years now. However, I did retire at 52, so I guess I'm not that old. Though I do feel like I'm 85 or so. I went to the internet and asked something like "what time does the average retiree get up in the morning?" I was kind of surprised that "everybody" gets up earlier than I do. Since I'm kind of aimless these days, not playing the horses much at all, I tend to treat every day as "a Sunday" and generally get up between 10 and 11 a.m. I guess I'm a "night person" but I'm not out there, going to jazz clubs or shooting pool or anything anymore. I have become addicted to Netflix, so that accounts for my late rising, since I find I get to bed between 2:30 and 3:00 a.m. after a movie or two and maybe a Perry Mason or Jack Benny from Youtube for a laugh before bedtime.

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    1. Based on your late, late nights, getting up at 10 or 11 in the morning seems reasonable.

      Most of the retirees I know are early risers: some before 5:00am, but most around 6 or 6:30. I personally just can't stay in bed after 7 - I feel I am wasting the day! I do go to sleep by 10:30pm so that help explains my hours.

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