August 27, 2012

The New Retirement Go-To Web Site

A few months ago PBS launched an ambitious effort to connect with Baby Boomers and those approaching retirement age. The web site, NextAvenue.org promised to be a place where folks could receive and share information on all aspects of building a satisfying retirement.

The editor of the Money & Security and the Work & Purpose channels is Richard Eisenberg. Coming from previous positions with Yahoo, Good Housekeeping and Money Magazine among others, Richard joined PBS in November 2011 to begin work on this project. In May Richard contacted me to write articles for his section of the site. I thought now would be a good time to contact Richard, and ask how things are going so far.


*Richard, welcome. What prompted PBS to develop NextAvenue.org? Five years in the making, Next Avenue is a new national public media website launched by PBS stations across America. It is focused on America’s growing 50+ population.  Next Avenue was developed in response to the unprecedented age boom occurring in America. The site has the potential to engage, inspire and inform the more than 100 million people who are transitioning into what many see as a new life stage in human development – a stage between young adulthood and “old old.”

Next Avenue was conceived and developed by Twin Cities Public Television (tpt), in St. Paul, Minnesota, under the leadership of its President and CEO Jim Pagliarini; former PBS executive Judy Diaz, who serves as Next Avenue’s president; and Donna Sapolin, who is the site’s vice president and editorial director.

*How is Next Avenue different from other sources of retirement information available on the Internet? Nextavenue.org is a rich and comprehensive resource that offers the best information about topics and issues important to the people in this new life stage. Next Avenue provides critical information and perspectives with articles and blogs written by staff journalists 
and expert contributors; curated content from government and non-profit agencies and commercial media sources; video from PBS stations and independent producers; and community discussions in which users connect and share stories.

*You have up and running since late May. What has been the marketplace’s response so far? The response has been enthusiastic and gratifying. We have received many compliments from readers on our Facebook site as well as positive stories about the site in the media.
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Thanks, Richard. Like you, I believe NextAvenue has the potential of being an important one-stop site for those of us seeking to build a satisfying retirement. If you haven't spent much time exploring the site, let me give you a short overview.

There are six categories: Health & Well-Being, Money & Security, Work & Purpose, Living & Learning, Caregiving, and Video. In each are sub categories that include articles written about that subject, giving the reader a chance to join a discussion with others, and a toolbox to help set goals or learn even more about that topic.

I have found an absolute wealth of material in each of the categories. In fact, I look for topics and concerns that prove to be well-read as ideas for my own posts on Satisfying Retirement. If you haven't spent much time exploring NextAveneue.org, I urge you to head over when you have some time, hunt through all the categories, and see what you can find.

As retirement evolves from the "Sun City" image to a more active, productive, and individual journey I welcome sites like NextAvenue.org. The more information we can share and explore the better off we are. 

For full disclosure I am being compensated by PBS for the material I write for their site.